Raising Elite Competitors

A Mom's Honest Review & Sneak Peak Inside The Elite Mental Game

October 03, 2023 Coach Bre Season 2 Episode 162
Raising Elite Competitors
A Mom's Honest Review & Sneak Peak Inside The Elite Mental Game
Show Notes Transcript

Ever wondered how you can unlock your young athlete’s full potential and help them navigate life’s challenges with unwavering confidence? Join us for an exciting journey inside The Elite Mental Game, a program that’s changing the game for athletes and their parents!

Through the eyes of mom Lauren and her daughter Augusta, discover the transformative power of this program and how it’s shaping a new era in youth sports.

What We Talk About in the Episode:

  • The Elite Mental Game: A Game-Changer
  • Phases of the Elite Mental Game Program
  • Starting a Sport Later in Life: A Refreshing Perspective
  • The Turning Point: Recognizing the Need for Support
  • Discovering the Elite Mental Game Program
  • Getting the Athlete on Board: A Two-Step Process
  • Immediate Impact: Changes in Perspective
  • Empowering Athletes to Control Their Emotions
  • Strengthening the Parent-Athlete Relationship
  • Creating Shared Language and Understanding
  • Balancing the Investment of Time and Money

So, are you ready to empower your young athlete and strengthen your parent-athlete relationship? Dive into the full podcast episode and unlock the keys to a more fulfilling sports journey together!

Episode Highlights: 

[0:23] A sneak peek into The Elite Mental Game program for girl athletes and their moms, which includes mental training and support for both athletes and moms.

[1:54] Parental involvement: Parents learn how to support athletes through a separate half of the program, fostering a strong athlete-parent relationship.

[04:23] The four main phases in The Elite Mental Game program.

[07:11] Parenting and athletic challenges with a former program participant.

[13:05] Supporting a teenage volleyball player struggling with confidence.

[17:24] Mental game coaching for athletes.

[21:18] Parenting and athletic performance.

[26:25] Parenting a teen athlete with shared language and strategies.

[31:58] Prioritizing mental training for athletes with a helpful assistant.

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Thank you in advance for joining us on our mission and leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts.

Welcome back to the raising elite competitors podcast. I'm coach Bree, a mental performance coach for a girl athletes. And I'm so happy that you are here, whether you are just getting started on this sports mom journey with your athlete, or you have a lot of seasons under your belt. You're in the right place. This podcast is for you to help you develop confidence and mental strength in your athlete, and also so that you can enjoy the sports journey as well. Today's episode is when I'm super excited about I'm giving you a sneak peek inside our signature mental training program called the elite mental game. Now this is formerly called the elite competitor program. So if you've been with us for awhile and you're familiar with the elite competitor program, we have updated the program. We've refreshed it. The content remains as powerful as it was before, as transformative as it. Before, but the way the athletes amongst moms consume the information and the additions that we have put into the program are significant. So in a second, I'm going to go over exactly what the elite mental game is. Some of the refreshes that we've made in the program. And then I'm going to cut to an interview that I had with a mom. Her name is Morin about her experience inside the program. So she's going to share. What she experienced as a mom going through the program, what her athlete experienced, and also things like how she got her athlete on board, when they made time for the program, all of those things that I commonly hear from our community, she is answering those questions and you get to hear just firsthand what the experience is like inside the elite mental game. All right. So let's get into this first part before I hand you off to my interview with Morin. So EMG, the elite mental game is our signature mental training program for girl athletes and their moms. This is where. Where athletes learn the mental side of their sport. They also learn our proven, unstoppable athlete method to help them build a foundation of mental skills that they need to be confident in their sport and outside of their sport. And it's also where you learn how to best support her. And the elite mental game is literally a game. So athletes and parents go through the program and as they do, they're earning points and unlocking prices. So as they complete trainings, which are very short, there are anywhere from five to 15 minutes. So we know the athletes. Attention spans are short. And so we make the trainings short and engaging. I also am a former teacher, I taught for 10 years. And so I bring all of that experience into the program like I said, they're fun. They're engaging, they're short. And as athletes complete trainings, they get points and they unlock prizes. So it's very motivating for them to continue to go. And the prices are really fun. They're not going to give them away or anything, but they are very motivating. Okay. And they're on both sides. Two athletes are in prizes. Parents are in prizes, I'm going to go through the phases that athletes and parents go through in order to build these skills. But before I do, I want to talk about what makes our approach to mental training. So different, maybe you've noticed, and that is that we have parent involvement. And so we believe that in order for athletes to develop the utmost confidence and mental strength, that it can't just be themselves. Yes. They do need to learn their skills in order to overcome and navigate the very normal parts of being an athlete. But they are best equipped when their parents are supported as well. When their parents know what to say and not say to build their confidence with them when their parents know what to say and not say before, during and after they compete. And so we have a whole half of our program is for sports parents to help them learn how to be a very supportive parent and set their athletes up for success. You won't see anything else like this? Our approach to mental training is what separates us and also gets us the best results in our program. That's why. Week after week when we have athletes coming through the program, parents coming through the program, we hear over and over how impactful this training is and how impactful this program is not only to their individual development. So athletes development, parent development, but also the athlete, parent relationship. And I honestly have seen this go. Very much bad and very much the wrong way when parents don't know how to support their athletes or even worse, they think they're supporting their athletes, but actually making it worse. And then athletes end up walking away from their sports or they end up resenting their parent as a result of all that. And so this program allows for this facilitation of conversation for athletes and parents. And it's so powerful in that way. So note on that, and that will also help set the stage for how this program looks. Some, take you through the phases of the program. There are four main phases in the elite mental game. So, before any of the phases start, we have our warmup phase, right? it's a game. So we got a warm up. And so in this warmup phase, both athletes and parents will just get oriented with the program. So they just get an understanding of what their training portal looks like. They also get welcome from an alumni. All of these really fun things, very short warmup in phase one, athletes go through their bounce back in a snap challenge. Now this is a challenge that athletes can complete however fast they want. They can actually complete it in one sitting and then less than an hour, and they walk away with a tool to help them come over mistakes. So it's called our snapback routine. And it is a proven tool that they can use to help them overcome mistakes that they make, or even if they just get thrown off and out of the zone. And a practice or a competition. So like I said, they can learn this in less than an hour and then use it at their practice that night, or if they want to spread it out over a week, that's fine too. In this phase on the parent side of the program, parents are also engaging in their own challenge. On how to best support their athletes overcome a mistake. So there's two parts to this, right? When you see your athlete, making them stick on the court, you can't gum down from the stands and like insert yourself in the game and help them. Right. They have to have the skill to be able to overcome that mistake, but you also can do your part in supporting them overcome mistakes. So there's a lot that you can actually do that. Doesn't involve you coming down from the stands and being in the game. Okay. So you'll learn how to do that in your challenge. And phase two. You both learned the elite mental game foundations. And I practice mentioned after phase one, you both earn a prize. So don't forget about that. Okay. Phase two, the elite mental game foundation. So this is where athletes learn the foundations of mental training. That's where they learn the common things like breath, work, visualization, their daily mindset routine with their goals are all of those things to build the foundation of their mental game. And the parents have the program. This is where parents learn the foundations of being a supportive sports parents. This is where you'll learn our philosophy around sports parenting. And we lean heavily into the research in this area, especially from the work of Dr. Becky Kennedy and the work of Dr. Lisa Demore as well. So we applied their parenting strategies in the context of athletics, and that's where you get to learn the foundations of how to show up best for your athlete and phase three. This is our high-performance game plan for athletes. So this is where they learn their pre. Pre post and during competition routines to help them perform their best. They learn what their pre-competition routine is. They create it. They also learn a productive way to process when they are done competing, when are loose that they can improve. And this phase, this is where you learn your powerful pep talks game plan. So you learn what to say and do before, during and after competitions. And you also learn how to create a custom. Pre-competition routine with your athletes. It's very powerful. Phase four. This is the mental edge toolkit. Oh, I forgot to mention. You unlock a prize after phase three? Heck yeah. Okay. Please for the mental edge toolkit for athletes and the elite sports parent tool kit for parents. We call it a toolkit because it equips you and your athlete with tools to navigate some things that come up in the athletic journey. So for athletes that looks like comparison, perfectionism, what to do. We have an injury or a setback, how to manage stress, like all of these areas that are going to happen and we give them tools to navigate it. And then for parents that looks like, how do I help my athlete? Who has perfectionists. Actionism how, what do I do when my athlete is injured? Managing kind of the politics of sports that happen. All of those things that. You will face, and this is guidance on how to navigate that. And then lastly, so we have these four main phases, but our last phase is just a quick one for phase five. We talk about how to make these skills sticks both for you and for your athlete. And then you unlock a couple more prizes. So throughout this whole game. Athletes and parents have 12 weeks of live support. So what that looks like is that athletes get to come on calls with me and with our other elite competitor coach two times a month, we split that by age because we know. You in the middle school and younger athletes are dealing with slightly different things in the high school and college level athletes. Athletes also get coach on call, text support, and you also get coach on call, text to support as well. So when you're in the program and your athletes in program, and she has a phone. Then they can text back. On that number, where they get reminders and they get coaching from us and our team. And so do you, for the mom, the parent side, you also get live support in the form of our community. So you've joined our sports moms inner circle, where you can ask questions, you connect with other moms. We do a zoom call once a month. We do live trainings. Every other week as well on topics that you want to hear from. And so a lot of support as you go through the game and the game can be done as fast or as slow as you want. If your athlete is eating it up and she's just, you know, racking up the points, learning the skills, then she can go through it pretty fast and she can have these skills at her fingertips to use in her games and in her practices. And same with you. Now we also have some bonuses that are happening right now. So if you're listening at the time of recording around last week of September, early October we have our thrive under challenging coaches and rise above teammate, drama bonuses as well. So those are really great to help you navigate again, just those normal parts of being an athlete and being a sports mom. You're going to have challenging coaches. Your daughter will encounter negative teammates and how do we handle it? These trainings teach you exactly how. So that is an overview of the elite mental game. And I am so excited about the changes that we have made to the program. If you are familiar with the competitor program, again, the content is still amazing. We still teach our, method in here and previous strategies that are rooted in sports, psychology and research, but now we've made it even easier for athletes and parents to go through and earn prizes along the way, which is pretty awesome. All right. What we're going to do right now is switch to this interview with Lauren. So you are going to hear from a parent who has been through the program and you get to see it from her perspective. So I hope that you enjoy this interview as much as I love sitting down with Lauren and hearing about her experience inside the elite mental game.

Breanne:

Welcome Lauren to the Raising Elite Competitors podcast. Thank you so much. I'm happy to be here. Yeah, super excited. I am so curious to hear from you about your experience, Augusta's experience, all the things. And so let's kick this off and first let us know, How old your athlete is and what sports she plays.

Lauren:

Yes, so Augusta is my kiddo. She's 15 years old and she is a volleyball player. And volleyball was a sport that she found kind of later. It was the first sport that she really and is now a one sport athlete, loves it, plays it all year round.

Breanne:

Yeah. She sounds like me. I didn't start playing volleyball until I was actually a sophomore in high school. And by like today's standards, I know that's like very unheard of. I tell that to my athletes and they're like, what?

Lauren:

I'm going to tell Augusta that and that's going to make her feel really

Breanne:

reassured. Yeah, exactly. And then like her, I just like. And it became my sport, and it has served me really well, not just in the terms of like, you know, I got to play in college and all of that, but it's just opened a lot of doors and been a great experience. So yeah, don't get discouraged. Also, you know, moms of athletes, if your athlete is starting a sport later, that's great. Like it's awesome when they find those things that light them up and go for it. So. Yeah,

Lauren:

I feel like there's an incredible amount of pressure to feel like your kid needs to start when they're five in the sport. They're going to play their whole life. But it is great to know they can always discover something, whether they're 13 or, you know, when I take up at 40,

Breanne:

whatever. Yeah, yeah, that's good. And that's a good way to like, we'll get into this actually. But when we talk in the program about modeling. What you want to see in your athlete like that's such a good way to, I mean, I started playing pickleball recently and I'm like, Oh, I'm really not good at this. I'm like, but I'm teaching my kids that I can learn something new and be bad at it. Yeah. Yes. Cool. Well, you both have gone through. What was formerly called the Elite Competitor Program is now called the Elite Mental Game. So I do want to talk about that and your experience. So can you first tell me, like take me back to before you both decided to join the program and paint me a picture of What things were like.

Lauren:

Yes. So as I said, Augusta was relatively new to the sport of volleyball, but found it and loved it. And she wanted to grow every day, put everything into it, get better. So she had just started her first club volleyball season and that whole scene was totally new to us. Very immersive. And of course she had. She had bad days, but about midway through the season, it felt like her frustrations started to set in. She just was running up against obstacles in the classic practice was going well, but she'd get to a tournament and it just wouldn't go well. And she was spiraling. And as a mom watching from the sidelines, I could see it happening. I could see she'd make a mistake and just watch her get flustered. And if you're a parent to a teenage girl, you probably know the face covering that happens on the court, the, oh, no, I made a mistake. And I want everyone else to know that I know that I made a mistake. And she was starting to play it safe. And you could just tell she was afraid of making mistakes. So I was watching her participation go from optimism and fun to what was starting to feel like miserable. Wasn't fun anymore. And I think the real turning point was with all of my good intentions and wanting to help her think about what was going on. I made the colossal mistake of commenting to her that it looked like maybe her confidence had been shaken and she had lost some of her confidence. And it turns out if there's one thing you can do to really shake someone's confidence, it's point out that their confidence has been shaken. And. So that was the turning point that I said, I need to fix what I'm doing. And I just want to find out better ways to support her so she can start having fun again out there.

Breanne:

Yeah, yeah. Oh, thank you so much for sharing that, because that's where a lot of moms are, and it's so relatable, and we come from a place of wanting to help, and so just pointing out the obvious is like, right, what seems like it will help, but then it's like, well, what are they supposed to do with that?

Lauren:

Yeah. She made some comment about like, Oh, so now I need to be fixed. Right. Oh, I didn't mean that.

Breanne:

Yeah. Yeah. Totally. Okay. So then I'm assuming you got like a message from the gods or something and we showed up. Crazy Google searches. Huge doorstep. Yeah. So tell me about, how did our worlds collide? Yeah. Totally.

So

Lauren:

I think I probably stumbled across the podcasts and started furiously listening and trying to see what I could do to better support her, which led me to the elite mental game program. And I just immediately thought. Based on everything I was hearing about it, that it was exactly what would be so good

Breanne:

for her. Yeah. Oh, cool. Okay. Yeah, so you found the podcast. That's great. Okay. So then here's something that A lot of moms struggle with a little bit and that is they recognize they're where you are. It's like they want to know how to best help their athlete. So you recognize what actually some parents don't and realize that you play a part in all of this. And it's not like my athlete just needs to change in who they are. It's no, I need to adjust how I approach my athlete and I need to provide her with skills so that she can navigate what she's facing. And so you were at this place and probably were like, yep, this is what we need. How did you get Augusta on board? How did you present it to her in a way that made her want to join?

Lauren:

It was a two step process that started with a failure and ended with a win. So I started by saying, Hey, I found this really cool program. it's mental training. I think you'd really enjoy it. And based on some of the things we're seeing and you're talking about, I think it could really help. And that's where I got the comment of. Oh, so you're putting me in a program to fix my confidence, right? That didn't go well. Okay. Yeah. So my next step, and I wish I had done this the first go round is I listened to the podcast episode that's directed to the athlete and telling them about the program. And as I listened to it, I thought. All of this is going to resonate with Augusta because none of it is about what you need to fix. All of it is about everything you're experiencing is so normal and you have control over how you respond to these very, very normal things, which takes away, you know, your mom's voice saying there's something wrong and changes the story altogether. So I sent her the podcast and I said to her, if you would listen to this podcast. After tell me what you think. And if you tell me, go away, I'm not interested. I will shut up. I will never bring it up again. This is a no pressure situation other than listening to the podcast. But in the back of my head, I was thinking if this podcast. Can't convince her then nothing will right sure enough. She went away She listened to the podcast and she came out and very calmly said I actually think that might be really good for me

Breanne:

Oh, my gosh. And you're probably jumping up and down inside like, All right. I'm on the outside and like, Yes. All right. Good. Yeah. That's so great. Yeah. I'll link to that podcast as well. Cause I know there's moms that are like, okay, how do we present? We also have come up with now probably since you've joined a conversation starter guide for moms and athletes. And we have a daughter website as well, but like you said, so it's interesting. And this makes a lot of sense. So as we were talking about and considering our name change of from the elite competitor program to the elite mental game and which we're not going to go totally into, but this summer at our Costa Rica retreat, we had, you know, a bunch of athletes with us and we're like, we should just ask them, like, what did they want to be a part of? And we were throwing around names like the confidence program or like the confident girl athlete and they were like, no, no, no. Like they're like, yeah, we want to be a part of that, but we would not want anyone to know that we weren't in that. And so that just reminds me that the athletes want it, but sometimes the way that it's. presented, and if it's presented as something like you have a lack of confidence and you need to fix it, then they don't want anything to do with it. So yeah, I think that was very smart on your end to have it come from me or somebody else. Like another strategy we tell moms is you know, find examples of athletes that they look up to talking about the mental games that like professional college athletes. Because yeah, that's really what it is, is to help them be the athlete that they want to be and give them a competitive advantage because every athlete faces it and which athlete's going to be better, the one that doesn't know how to come back from mistakes or the one that does. And so it's almost like. They have now a competitive advantage over other people.

Lauren:

So it's a great reframing of, wow, you're unlocking this opportunity versus you have something wrong that needs to be fixed. And I think what really came through for her is your voice, your credibility, as you know, you are an athlete who went through this talking to an athlete who's in it now. And it's very different than a parent.

Breanne:

Yeah, exactly. Yeah, we get to be your megaphone in a lot of ways. Okay, so that's great. So you join. I guess it gets going, you get going. And so tell me about what happened. What did you start to notice when you both started the program?

Lauren:

I don't want to oversell, but I will say within a week, there were noticeable. And such a positive impact. So I will oversell. That's just,

Breanne:

that's just what it is. It's not even,

Lauren:

For myself, what I noticed or what I changed is that shut my mouth a lot more, and I started listening a lot more, and I stopped trying to fix everything for her, which, it's really hard. To watch your kid come out of a competition and be so hard on themselves when you've watched with your own two eyes What's happened and you just want them to see? Themselves through the eyes that you can see them through and so had fallen into the trap of when she didn't think she did well try to point out the things that went well or try to boost her up and I Shifted from trying to convince her that she did better to just acknowledging where she was at. And our conversations got better and I think it helped me remember my role. That she's the one out there playing. She's the one with the experience. She's the one with the feelings. And, it's not my place to change her feelings, it's just not. And that actually gave me a sense of freedom as well. Like, I just got to, like, lifted some of that burden of like, I need to make it better for her. And I felt this freedom of, I don't need to make it better for her, that's not my role. By simply listening and acknowledging and validating her feelings. All of those feelings dissipate probably more quickly than when I was trying to convince her that her feelings weren't true.

Breanne:

Yeah, that's so powerful. I mean, it, I'm a simple example. It's that, like, when we've had just, like, a rough day, things aren't going right, one thing after another, we come home and we're like, oh, today is so stressful. And then it's like, our partner says, well, maybe if you would have, like, planned a little bit more, or it probably wasn't that bad. You're probably exaggerating. Let's think of the good things. And you're like, seriously. Can you just acknowledge that it wasn't great for me? Yeah. And then it feels so much better. And you know, we talk a lot in the program, and this work is based in Brene Brown's research and Dr. Becky Kennedy, Dr. Lisa Damore, like the big hitters in psychology and parenting. In the research in that area and how it applies to athletics is the perspective that we bring in that allowing our athletes to experience those emotions and helping them process is confidence building and allowing them to not be afraid of all of the things that come with being a human and they get to experience those things on a really great massive level when they experience them in sport because it's like you get the highs you get all sides of it and yeah being able to like walk alongside her in that journey is really important so nice job

Lauren:

it's super powerful thank you and the other change when observing Augusta that was also Barely immediate, even before she had learned all of the exercises and the skills her body language on the court and watching how she was dealing with making a mistake that she was just bouncing back more quickly. And the way that she said it to me, she actually pulled me aside mid tournament and said, something about it's so tempting to want to start to sulk and have a pity party. And I'm just now realizing that I don't have to do that. Yeah. That, that I can just change the way I'm looking at going forward and it changes everything. Yeah. Oh yeah. I know that feeling. I love, I love a good pity party. Yeah. But it's not helping. Yeah. In this moment, right now, on the court, the pity party is not helping. Yeah. And so that was just a light bulb moment for her, is that she didn't need to live in that negative state. And it was something that she had.

Breanne:

Control over. Wow. That is so powerful. I mean, as adults, that's like a very powerful thing to realize. And you're hitting on something that a lot of athletes experience, which is they feel like they have to beat themselves up. Like you were saying in the beginning, like I have to show everybody that I care and that's why I'm going to do this. I'm doing the hands over my face and like beat myself up because need to show them that I care about this somehow. But in reality that makes you play worse. And. then you end up like actually disappointing people even more if that's how you're thinking of it. And so just releasing that and realizing, hey, I don't have to I really don't have to. That's so cool. Yeah. Oh, that's great. Okay. And so yeah, so you're going through your part and you're kind of changing your approach. I guess is learning the skills and the tools, and you've already kind of talked about this. But maybe there's more to share in this area of how your relationship with her has changed as you've gone through the program.

Lauren:

I think the biggest shift, well, two things. I stopped feeling so much like I was walking on eggshells. Because when I wasn't trying to come up with the right thing to say, I was no longer tiptoeing and nervous around saying the right or wrong thing. And she got better at telling me what she wanted and needed for support and what support looked like for her. And one of our ongoing things is she doesn't love having us parents at her competitions. She would prefer we stay away, which I respect and understand and want to honor. I also really love watching her play. And in some cases I've driven two hours to a tournament and my alternative is sitting in the hotel room, not watching her play. So we had some good conversations about if I'm there, how does she want me to show up? And it turns out in my enthusiasm and cheering and positivity, that wasn't what she wanted. She wanted to not feel any emotion coming out of me. She wanted me to just be a calm, barely there presence. And I said, I can try to do that. And occasionally a squeal or comes out of me or I might jump up. But now I know, like, that's what she needs from me is to just be calm. And it opened up the door for me to start attending. Some, not all competitions.

Breanne:

Yeah. Oh, that's good. Because obviously we want to, there's been other moms who have come through the program or parents who have a similar thing where it's like at the beginning, I, they're like, I don't attend any of the competitions because she doesn't want me there. And the goal is that we get at the end to a place where. You are attending, and you're, you're showing up as, you know, the support that she needs, while also balancing who you are. We talk about that in the program, like, it has to be a balance, right? If your personality is the hype mom, and, and that's who you are, then we need to channel that in a way that's helpful. But yeah, the goal is that you're there and that she feels supported and then figuring out, I wonder what's underlying there, you know, is she, is there a fear of letting people down, letting you down and too much pressure, you know, all of that. So it sounds like it was a good opportunity to open up dialogue around that.

Lauren:

And then we had shared language to talk about these things through the program that we were both learning about, and I could ask her questions in a way that she was already working on identifying these feelings for herself.

Breanne:

Yeah. Yeah. Oh, that's so great. Yeah. That shared language is super important. The first seven days of the program. So actually when you go through it again, the refreshed elite mental game, we basically took the snapback routine that you were talking about overcoming mistakes. We put that at the beginning. And now it's a challenge. So athletes go through and they learn the snapback routine as fast as they want. They could actually learn it in under an hour. Yeah. And apply it to their practice or game that night. Or if they want to spread it out over a week. So the athletes go through that. So they get that quick win and strategy. And then parents also go through their challenge on how to support athletes overcoming mistakes. So they have that common language off the bat. Like their, lessons are very much aligned to each other. So they can be talking. Hey, what's your reset word? What's your reset signal? Like those type of things. So that's pretty cool

Lauren:

Yeah, and there's also something about the shared program where I feel like this might sound lame But before I maybe would have felt awkward. Like, there's, the advice of, like, the consistency before a competition and what's the routine? What's the thing that you're always going to do? And I had my little thing that I wanted to say to her before. I think maybe I would have been a little shy to suggest to her that I had this thing I wanted to say. But I got to say the program told me to. So here it is. And she's like, yeah, we're in the program. So we're going to do what the program tells us to do. It's like permission to try new things that maybe we wouldn't have

Breanne:

otherwise. I love that. Yeah, it's like my assignment this week is to ask you. Right. Yeah, that's great. It sounds like you both have a great relationship and you talk in person, but I tell parents as well. They can do that in any way. Like they could text about it. One family actually, they just left like a journal out on their kitchen table. And so they would write like athlete on one side, mom on the other, like what their. Response was for that week's assignment. I was like, Oh, that's a good idea. It's like, you don't want the, like, as much of the confrontation. I know, I know teens can be like angsty in some ways. They might not all want to like talk unless it's, you know, at 11 o'clock at night, maybe.

Lauren:

Totally. Whatever gets the

Breanne:

job done. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Well, this has been so great so far. I love hearing your experience and some of the nuances that you have had throughout the program. Okay. Here's a practical question. How did you make time? for this. How did you, I mean, you prioritize it. Anything we prioritize, we do make time for, but literally, how'd you make time for it?

Lauren:

Actually, I think the idea of making time for it was harder than the time required. The lessons themselves were pretty short and, you know, 20 minutes at a time. And quite honestly, I could easily scroll through reels for 20 minutes mindlessly. So yeah, I actually didn't find it to be a burden to my time. I think the harder part was probably making sure that Augusta was staying on top of it without nagging Augusta to stay on top of it. So kind of preplanning how and where it was going to fit into her life after school between tournaments,

Breanne:

et cetera. Yeah. Yeah, for sure. And so we teach athletes in the beginning to, decide, you know, what day a week are you going to do it? If you're going to do it once a week. And another thing about the elite mental game is it's literally a game. So you guys, you should go back through it and about mid October you'll have access. But. Literally a game now. So they get points. You do too. As you complete training and trainings are even shorter now, they're like five to 15 minutes. You get a point for every training you complete and then you rack up points and unlock prizes. There's like three or four prizes that you unlock as you go through the program that are really fun. So yeah. And that's another way for athletes. to stay engaged in it. Because although we don't find it like too difficult for athletes to do that, having even more of that like dopamine release, you know, when you score a point, earn a prize, it just helps kind of keep them going throughout it. Yeah,

Lauren:

so. Well, and I would also imagine early on, you're really hungry for the info. And so I was just thinking about, oh, well, It hadn't been in weekly chunks when I was going through the program and it had all been available. I probably would have binged the first half of it in the first day. Yes. And part of the challenge of making time is fitting it into, you know, like trying to hit it once a week, right? Where do I find the time once a week to do it? So I like that flexibility And for the athlete as well, just move if you're motivated and you're excited. Yeah. If you're getting through as much of it as you want to, while it's all really exciting and

Breanne:

new. Yeah. Yeah. We don't want to slow them down, especially if they're on that, like, hi, it's like, yeah, keep going. So cool. Okay. Well, is there anything else you want to add or anything that you would tell other moms that are considering joining?

Lauren:

I think. I would say to other moms it is for sure an investment. It's an investment of time and it's an investment of money, but to see the joy come back into your child and to feel your own shoulders go down a couple of inches with relief, it's, it could not be more worth

Breanne:

it. Yeah. Oh my gosh, you're making me tear up. Because that's really, I mean, you can't put a price on that.

Lauren:

Well, and the, dividends pay outside of sport as well. And I've heard Augusta on multiple occasions say how, what she's learned, I mean, the mindset principles apply to life, not just sport. So if she doesn't play sport past high school, I still think what she's learned through the program, even if it's only the light bulb going off that I, do have control over how I think about things that will serve

Breanne:

her well forever. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Oh, I'm so happy that you two are with us, that you have gone through the program, you're in our community. It just means so much also that you're coming on here to share your story and and share this experience with other moms too. So thank you, really appreciate it.

Lauren:

Thank you, we're so grateful we found you.