Raising Elite Competitors

72hr BONUS: How To Strengthen Your Athlete Daughter's Confidence... so she believes in herself & plays like it!

February 12, 2024 Coach Bre
Raising Elite Competitors
72hr BONUS: How To Strengthen Your Athlete Daughter's Confidence... so she believes in herself & plays like it!
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

72 Hour Special REPLAY of our live training for sports moms: How to Strengthen Your Athlete's Confidence...so she believes in herself and plays like it!

In this replay of our live training, we cover:
✅ The most common mistakes sports moms make when building confidence in their athlete daughter (and how to avoid them)

✅ How to help your athlete: overcome mistakes, release the pressure she's feeling, and flip her negative mindset

✅ Strategies you can start RIGHT NOW to build your athlete's confidence (things her coach is likely not teaching)

Plus, Coach Bre answer's some awesome questions from moms!

Dive in! This episode is only live for 72 Hours!

P.S. The Elite Mental Game is OPEN for Winter Special Enrollment! Join before Friday, February 16th to save $400 on the program, plus grab bonuses we're offering this time around!

Check out EMG here: www.elitecompetitor.com/emg

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Ever wonder how a young female athlete can turn a game's pressure into her power play? 

This week, Coach Bre reveals the secrets to fostering confidence in girls as they navigate the competitive world of sports. We dissect the mental hurdles that can trip up even the most promising athletes, from the fear of failure to the sting of tough coaching and team drama. 

This replay of our current live free training swings open the door to strategies that transform these challenges into opportunities for growth, teaching parents how to support their daughters in building resilience and mastering their mental game.

Step onto the field of our latest episode where we share the game-changing Elite Mental Game program, the top mental training program specifically for female athletes and their moms (dads & sons included, too!)

We delve into actionable exercises such as visualization and breathwork, providing young athletes with the tools to bounce back from setbacks and stay in the zone. 

Listen as we recount inspiring success stories of athletes like Becca and Coco, who not only improved their athletic performance but also learned valuable life skills through mental fortitude. 

Parents, take note: we're handing you the playbook to help your daughters not just play their best, but enjoy every minute of the game.

Rounding out our training, we tackle some of your burning questions and shine a spotlight on specific athletic challenges, such as gymnast mental blocks and competitive cheerleading frustrations. 

We provide a roadmap for seamlessly integrating our mental training program into your athlete's routine, regardless of the season or sport. Whether you're the mother of a budding basketball star or the father of a fierce gymnast, join us as we equip you for the journey of nurturing confident, resilient, and joyful young athletes.

Speaker 1:

Hello, good morning, good afternoon. Welcome everybody. It's good to see you. Go ahead and open up your chat. We're going to be using that today. It's so good to see so many of you.

Speaker 1:

This is my third live training this week and I can my voice. I'm already like, oh, it sounds a little different, but I've got enough in it to finish strong with all of you and I'm so excited. Awesome, I see some familiar names in here. Welcome, okay, open up your chat. Before we get going, let me know in the chat where are you coming from, what's forces your daughter play? We're going to get going here very shortly on our training, all about how to increase your athlete's confidence so she believes in herself and plays like it. Right, that's what we want. All right, welcome, kim. Hey Renee, hi Alex, we got a polo, basketball, volleyball, gymnastics I love it. Ooh, I got some multi-sport athletes in here, very cool. All right, if you're just coming in, we're saying where you're coming from, what sport your daughter plays. We're going to get going here in just a second.

Speaker 1:

If I haven't met you, I am Coach Bree. I'm the co-founder of the Elite Competitor. I am a mental performance coach for girl athletes. Christina is the other co -founder. She is on. She will be here in the chat, and then Kim is also on today. Kim is actually one of the moms who have been through our program, the Elite Mental Games, so she's going to be here, kind of sharing some perspective, answering questions and just being her awesome self. So you're going to see Christina and Kim in there. If you have any questions, pop them in the chat. They will be grabbing them, answering them, and we're going to do some Q&A at the end as well. So if you've got something specific, just drop it in the chat and we will answer it either in the chat or at the end. Cool, welcome.

Speaker 1:

If you are coming in, we are just opening up our chat, putting where you're from, what sports your daughter plays, and let's see Laura, angie, nikki, if you're coming here again, I see some familiar names. So if you're watching this again, awesome. You're really committed to making this work like getting the knowledge in Awesome. Okay, let's get going with it. We actually have a lot of information to go through and I'm so excited, so let's dive in. I'm going to be honest. The whole reason why we have this training, by the way, yesterday was National Women and Girls in Sports Day, and what better way to celebrate than to be on with all of you moms with this common goal of building confidence in our girl athletes?

Speaker 1:

Because I have been a coach for over 12 years. I've been coaching high school volleyball at the varsity level and, to be honest, I was sad and tired of my own athletes playing really good in practice falling apart in a game. They would make mistakes and then not know how to come back from them and then just beat themselves up and I'm like, oh my gosh, I can teach you skills day in and day out, but when it comes to doing it, this is getting in the way, your brain's getting in the way. And I experienced I'm a former college athlete, been a teacher. I get it, I experience it, and I know you do too. All right.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, tell me in the chat if this has been a conversation that you've had with your daughter in the car ride home. Right, I can't tell you how many conversations we had at the dinner table or in that car ride home telling her you are good enough, you do have the skills, you do belong on this team. Tell me in the chat if that has been a conversation in your household. Yes, 100%, yeah, like, come on, you're on the scene for a reason. They picked you for a reason, right, how about this one? I want my daughter to stop comparing herself and caring whatever people think so much. Okay, it's annoying and it's hard for her to watch her be so hard on herself.

Speaker 1:

Give me a yes in the chat if you experience this too. Yeah, kelly, marching band for sure. Okay, performance based, absolutely. It's like put the blinders on, focus on you, doesn't matter what she's doing. Yeah, how about this one? I want her to play with confidence, shake off mistakes not have to be perfect all the time and here's a concept have some fun. How about that one? Give me a yes in the chat if you're like yeah, you know, obviously your daughters are competitive, likely. Okay, and you may be our competitive. Maybe you're a former athlete.

Speaker 1:

Okay, yeah, Abel didn't fall far from the tree. I hear you All right same with me. I'm a competitive coach. I played college volleyball, you know I still play. But also there has to be an element of fun and enjoyment for your daughter to actually play to her potential and stay in the sport and not burnout, okay. So we've got to have that. And, honestly, our approach to mental training, you'll find, is a little bit different, and one of the ways that we approach mental training is that there should be an enjoyment. It doesn't have to be this, all this mental toughness. Ignore your emotions. It's hey, can we make sure that we are connected to our sport? Absolutely yeah. And so you're here because you see all of those things, and I see it too.

Speaker 1:

And now you're in this like kind of tough spot of how do you help her? How do you balance encouraging without pushing too hard? You want to encourage her but you don't want her to burn out? Okay, and most moms get this wrong by Googling for random tips and advice. If you have been to Google university, raise your hand, don't be shy. I've been there too, okay. But here's the thing googling for random tips and advice. Yeah, I see you, molly, it's okay, we've all been there and then trying to be like hey, you know, try this, I saw this on Instagram, try this. And that she's like Mom, come on. All right, if you did Google, and then we popped up and you're here like you did find something useful, so that's good, all right. But typically just Googling for tips is not going to work. All right, thinking your daughter will pick it up with time. Okay, so you know the next team, the next coach, the next, and then she'll be confident and then she'll be mentally tough. The opposite is true. The higher she goes in her sport, the more levels she climbs, the more will be expected of her, the more that coach is actually going to expect her to come back from a mistake faster, going to expect her to perform when the pressure is on, not the opposite. So we have to make sure she had those, has those skills ahead of time. That's like me not teaching my kids how to swim, not putting in the swimming lessons and then putting them into the deep end and being like, good luck, you'll get, you'll just pick up the skills, right? No, that's not how it works, all right. And then this last one, relying on the coach to figure it out. I get it.

Speaker 1:

Coaches wear a lot of hats. As a coach myself, yes, and how many of you tell me in the chat if you've heard something like this from your daughter's coach? She has all the physical skills. It's her mental game holding her back. Right, she's talented, but it's her confidence. Only she believed in herself more. Yeah, exactly, coaches say that all the time.

Speaker 1:

And then you as a mom are like, yeah, okay, but can you teach her how to do that Right? Like, can you teach her those mental skills? Here's the deal. Most coaches are not trained in how to teach the mental side of the game. When I became a coach, like I said, about 12 years ago, I was not taught this. I had to go out, use my own time, my own money, my own resources to be certified as a mental performance coach and teach this to my athletes and then build the company that we have Right, and so do not rely on her coach to teach this most essential part of her game. All right, and that is exactly why we've created the unstoppable athlete method and you're going to learn about this today. Okay, this is the solution that I used to coach my high school volleyball team all the way to state champs we just won our third state championship in a row this past fall and also with thousands of moms and girl athletes inside our programs and inside the elite mental game, which you're going to learn about at the end as well. Thanks, anna, it was an accomplishment. Yeah, like three in a row was. It's one thing to get to the top, it's another thing to stay there, and I've interviewed my senior captains since that third state championship. They're actually they've been on the podcast last week and they said our mental training is what allowed us to perform in that most competitive environment.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so before we totally get into all of this, I have some details to share, and if you're just getting here, welcome. Okay, we're. We actually haven't totally gone into all the meat of the training yet. So, as a thank you for joining me live, thank you for carving time out of your busy day to be with us, I am giving you a free cheat sheet. So this is our 25 key phrases to say now. This is an awesome cheat sheet that has key phrases that you can say to your athlete before she competes. After she competes, when she's like beating yourself up and you're like I don't know what to say this is awkward, do I say silent or do I talk? And I'm giving this to you for free, just for being here live. So, in order to get that, okay, in order to get that here here, it is what you're going to do.

Speaker 1:

Christina is going to and Christina is the co other co founder if you didn't hear at the beginning of the elite competitor, she's going to drop a link in here and if you just click that link, if you have Facebook, it's going to send you to a messaging app. Okay, and our chatbot is in there. So, yes, it is a bot. She's very helpful. We actually nicknamed her Gabby and if you click on that, then Gabby will give you everything you need to get this cheat sheet into your inbox. Okay, so she'll ask you for your email and then it'll send it right away.

Speaker 1:

If you don't have Instagram, okay, or sorry, facebook you can go to Instagram and you can click the message button right here and then just type the word key and Gabby will help you out there as well. Okay, so I'm going to give you a second to do that, because this is an awesome guide for you and a great resource, all right, so go ahead and get that, click the link for Facebook. That's an easy its way to do it. If you don't have Facebook Instagram, click message, type in the word key and then it'll go through. Like I said, gabby is a bot, so don't be mean to her. All right, she's just there helping you out because I'm here with you and I can't be in Instagram right now. Okay, all right. All right, and I'll circle back at the end as well to make sure everybody has that Now. Also, at the end, we will be talking about the Elite Mental Game, which is our signature mental training program for girl athletes, and we have an a winter enrollment special going on right now with some pricing discounts and some bonuses, and at the end, we're actually giving away a free spot inside EMG. In addition, those of you that decide that you're going to take the next step into EMG with us while we're on here, live, we have a special bonus for those action takers.

Speaker 1:

So this is our Rise above teammate drama and thrive under challenging coaches training bundle. This is one of our most popular training bundles because, raise your hand or give me a nod, if you have ever had a challenging coach or if your daughter has ever had a challenging coach that maybe you don't agree with their coaching style, or like you had, you know, yeah, yeah, I'm seeing a lot of reason. Yes, absolutely we. If she hasn't, she will. Okay, and guess what? She needs to know how to navigate that. So this training bundle gives her the total framework on how to talk to her coach sentence starters, and then you also have your own training on how to navigate that. Like, do I step in, do I not? You know all those things. And then same thing with you know, teammate drama, it happens. Yeah, she's got negative teammates. So, absolutely, she needs a guide to help her with that. So that's what this training bundle accomplishes.

Speaker 1:

Also, at the end, like I said, we have like so many fun things happening right now for our winter enrollment, and another one of those things is our peak performance clinic that's happening this Sunday. So, yes, on Super Bowl Sunday we actually get to be training your daughter's mental game all around, how to stay motivated through the grind. Okay, it's later after the Super Bowl, but guess what? This is such a fun clinic for athletes because athletes all the time are telling me I'm not motivated, I'm not, blah, blah, blah. You know, I supposed to do this but I'm not, and they do not need to rely on motivation. Okay. So we teach them strategies to not rely on motivation, which is a feeling, but rely on discipline and strategies and prep work that they have done in order to stay motivated through the grind of athletics. So stay tuned on how you can make sure you get all of those things during this winter enrollment special. All right, let's dive into this. If you just came in, welcome, we're actually just getting going.

Speaker 1:

So I have worked with thousands of girl athletes and they all share similar types of goals. Let me know in the chat if you hear some of these things from your athlete, or what her goal is. We have result-oriented goals, like I want to make varsity. I want to playing college. I want to, you know, make it to the WNBA. Some of these are like very big, audacious goals, which are great. Okay, let me know in the chat. Like, what goals does your daughter have? Their outcome? Maybe she hasn't shared with you, but maybe you do know. Yeah, also, though, she has mental and emotional goals. So these are things like increase your confidence. Yeah, karen, increase your confidence. Right, I want to have fun. I want to make friends. These are things that are like kind of in this bucket of mental and emotional Okay and I'm like these are great.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, play B1 in college, win state, absolutely increase confidence. What's holding you back, like why aren't you going? Where are you going for those? All right, and she says things like this I feel pressure to be perfect. I feel like when I make mistakes I'm letting my team down. I can't seem to compete as well in a game as practice. I know some of you in the chat said it's actually the opposite, like she, you know, doesn't practice well and then competes Like that's also something going on with her mental game. Okay, and they are absolutely right. All right, here's the thing. Confidence is developed in your daughter's mind first, before it's visible on the court or the field. All right, and in order to illustrate this for you, I want you to do this activity with me.

Speaker 1:

It's only going to take two minutes and it's going to blow your mind. So if you're in a place where you can stand, please stand with me, and if you're driving or whatever, don't do that, okay. But if you have an opportunity to stand, I'm going to give you a second to do that. Okay, put your thumb out in front of your face. Okay, I'll give you another second. Okay, stand here with me now. All right, look at your thumb, look at your nail, look at the wrinkles around your thumb. Now, what I want you to do without hurting yourself Okay, without hurting you, that's key is I want you to open up as far as you can, and when you can't go any further, I want you to stop. Okay, so I'm going to get.

Speaker 1:

I'm actually a little sore this morning I'm going to get to that plant right there and then I'm going to put my thumb back in front of my face and put it down by my side. So you should have an image in your mind of, like where you couldn't go any further, to that plant that used to be dead and now it's alive because I got a new one. All right, now what I want you to do is you're going to close your eyes again If you're driving. Don't do this, okay. And I just want you to imagine in your mind that you're doing that again. You're putting your thumb out in front of your face. Just imagine you're not doing this with your physical body. Imagine now that you're opening up and you're getting to that first point in your room where you couldn't go any further. And I want you to visualize yourself pushing just a little bit further than you did before. I want you to create, like, a new point in your mind. Now I want you to imagine you're putting that thumb back in front of your face, putting it down by your side. Okay, open your eyes. All right, let's do this all together. Thumb out front of your face, open up to that first point. Now see if you can push to that second point that you visualized. Nice, okay, put that thumb back in front of your face, open your chat and give me a yes in the chat if you were able to go further that second time. Were you able to push further? Yeah, sure did. Okay, good job. Way to follow directions.

Speaker 1:

Sometimes, when I do this with athletes, they're like did you just do a magic trick on me? Like what did you just do? I'm like no, that's mental training. That is mental training. Your daughter's mind can both limit her and allow her to achieve more than she thought possible. Your mind limited you that first time. I've done this with so many ages of athletes. Yeah, the mind is so powerful Athletes. Their mind is the one that pulled them. Like you can't go farther. Physically, they could go further, just like when your daughter trains, you're like physically, you have all the tools, you're practicing, you can do it. It's your mind that's holding your back. But the good news is it's also her mind that will allow her to unlock more than she thought possible. She won't train, reach her potential until she gets her mind on board. Most average athletes and parents think that the key to this is more reps and physical practice. They're like well, got to get her a personal trainer, got to get her in the gym more? Yes, of course, training more is awesome, but most athletes are surprised because they're like well, I'm training more, but I'm actually not able to get better. That's because elite, confident athletes know it starts in the mind first.

Speaker 1:

Ok, now, this is what we call the elite performance formula. This is what your daughter needs in order to achieve her goals. Ok, and when I say elite, here's what I mean. Her business is called the elite competitor. We've got the elite mental game, the elite performance formula. Elite to us means that she's playing a potential, she has the skills to navigate the normal parts of being an athlete pressure, comparison, nerves, all those things, all right. And she has an enjoyment, a level of enjoyment to her sport. Ok, in order to do that, she needs three things knowledge of the sport, physical training and mental training. Ok, it's like a three-legged stool. Knowledge of the sport, tactics, strategies that comes kind of with time. Physical training You're probably totally checking the box in this area, right? Like, go to practice train. Some of you have personal trainers for your athletes. Like, you're probably doing all you can in that area. Mental training is where we see the most lack. Ok, so it doesn't matter how much physical skill your daughter has, if she does not believe in herself, if she doesn't have the skill to come back from a mistake in seconds or faster than her sport requires, if she can't handle the pressure, then she will never reach her potential. All right, at best she might just be playing OK, but not as good as she could. At worst. This is where we see athletes walking away from the sport that they love.

Speaker 1:

Ok, that was my story in high school, not going to go too deep into it, but I was a highly-recreated athlete, very talented. I didn't believe in myself. You couldn't tell from the outside, but on the inside I was like I don't know, I feel like so much pressure. Is anyone else feeling like this? Best option for me, what I thought, was to quit. So I quit. Ok, long story short, I actually did get an opportunity to walk on and then was a full-ride scholarship athlete at his amazing Division II college who I prioritize the mental side of the game. What a concept where I learned these skills and fell in love with my sport again and played really, really well.

Speaker 1:

But guess what? These skills are accessible to your daughter when she is in middle school, when she is in high school. She doesn't have to wait to be that 4% of athletes that make it to the college level to get trained on the mental side of the game. But these skills have to be taught and practiced, they're not just picked up along the way. So let's break it all down. We're going to get into the unstoppable athlete method. This is what we use to train the athlete's mindset and really it's three big buckets. So if you're coming in right now, great, we're getting into the unstoppable athlete method. So we've got overcoming mistakes, releasing the pressure and flipping her negative mindset. These are the three big drivers in her confidence. So let's break each one of these down.

Speaker 1:

Overcoming mistakes I know it's hard to watch her hesitate, hold back because she's afraid she's going to mess up, and then, if she does mess up, she's afraid to try again. She makes one mistake, then it's two and three and she ends up maybe on the bench. Give me a yes in the chat if you've ever seen this from your athlete, if you're sitting in the stands and you're like, oh gosh, here we go. I see her body language change. Yeah, I see you can't. Just like. You know, she here, it's kind of starting to spiral. Oh, now she's hesitating, now she's not taking risks. Yeah, it's frustrating. It's like she can't seem to snap out of it Absolutely. And here's the deal.

Speaker 1:

Most athletes are actually on or off and they blame it on other things outside of their control. It's kind of like a protective mechanism. They're like oh, it's the crowd size, it's the rough, it's the this, it's that, and it's really because they lack the skills to come back from mistakes. Ok, yeah, absolutely, with sons too. Like all these skills apply to sons as well. All right, and a lot of athletes just practice hard and hope they don't make a mistake, all right, they're like as long as I can put in a ton of physical reps, then I'll minimize my mistakes. And, yes, that's great. But mistakes happen, you know that. Ok, and as a result, they're at the mercy of their mistakes. They don't have a way to come back quickly, and so when mistakes happen, they go into a spiral.

Speaker 1:

Ok, and I know, being her mom, you want to fix it. All right. So you do things like you remind her hey, everyone makes mistakes. You give her a few pointers, right, like you try and coach her a little bit when really she's taking that as critique, and we'll talk about staying in your role later in the training. But you know what, if you've done these things, please know you're in the right place. We have all done these things, ok, like it is fine, me included. So you did not ruin your daughter. You're actually going to learn a different way, ok, and here's the reason why, or one of the reasons why, a lot of that advice and coaching actually isn't working it's because of science.

Speaker 1:

Ok, I'm going to get into a little bit of neuroscience here, because it's really important to the foundation of what's going on in your athlete's brain. Ok, you're probably familiar with something called flow state. All right, and this is where your athlete is in the moment. She's in the zone. She is actually not thinking too much, she's not worried about the past or the future. You probably have experienced flow state when you're doing something and you're like, wow, 15 minutes has passed by and you're like, wait, no, three hours have passed by, ok, and I've been playing pickleball this whole time. It's just flown. This is where athletes play their best and when they do, they have all of these neurotransmitters kind of coursing through their body. It's a really great state. Here's something that you need to know.

Speaker 1:

The brain's number one job is to protect us. All right, physical safety obviously keeps us breathing and all of that, but also it keeps us safe from psychological threats as well. Ok, psychological safety is also the responsibility of our brain, and so imagine and psychological safety means like do I fit in here? Right? Where am I in this social standing Now? So imagine, knowing that, what happens when your daughter makes a mistake?

Speaker 1:

She maybe has these subconscious thoughts of not being liked, letting people down, looking dumb and so much more. That's all going on and, as a result, this part of her brain called the amygdala is picking up on a threat. She makes a mistake in front of her peers, in front of all these people. Ok, she's not supposed to happen. Maybe the recruiters are there. It's like threat, threat, threat. Something is wrong, ok, and that's where her sympathetic nervous system kicks in. This is the part of her nervous system that is responsible for her fight or flight response. There's also freeze or fawn.

Speaker 1:

So if you have an athlete that, like freezes up, that is, she's dysregulated. She, her sympathetic nervous system, is doing what it's supposed to, really, ok, but in this moment she is flooded with adrenaline. She has scattered thoughts and behavior, she's got shallow breathing and when she's in this state, more mistakes are going to follow. Ok, her executive functioning is offline. So something simple that she would do like a layup in practice is now like she's missing and she's got like the yips is what a sports psychology term support that. Ok. So when she's in this state, excuse me, nothing you, her coach or her teammates say is actually going to help her bounce back. It's like a dysregulated toddler throwing a fit on the ground. You don't go up to that toddler and be like, hey, calm down. And they're like, oh, all right, ok, it just doesn't happen. But training her brain and body to bounce back is actually possible. But it has to be learned and practiced. Ok, and here's how we do it.

Speaker 1:

These five I'm going to kind of go through these five steps here, all right. Number one is a mindset shift. Average athletes think that mistakes are bad and should be avoided. Elite, confident athletes know that mistakes are necessary for growth. So right at the gate, they have a different mindset around mistakes in general. Number two situational planning. Average athletes really practice hard to make sure they don't make mistakes. Ok, but they will. So elite confident athletes. They practice hard to Like. They're very meticulous with their training.

Speaker 1:

Mental training doesn't replace physical training. However, it gets the most out of her physical training, and they also have pre-visualized responses to mistakes. They know situations that kind of like. Throw them off, and they have a pre-visualized response to it. Your athlete actually is visualizing all the time. She, though, is likely visualizing things going badly. She's visualizing making a mistake, spiraling, getting pulled out, because that's what our brain does to try and keep us safe.

Speaker 1:

Elite confident athletes do the opposite. They see the mistake happening and what is going to trigger them, and they see a different response. They notice the signal, so we describe this like a stoplight. There's red, we'll start with green. Green is in the flow, yellow as I'm starting to get out Maybe there's a situation that happened. Red is un-dysregulated. I'm spiraling, help, ok. Average athletes go from green to red fast. They are just hijacked by this fight-or-flight response. Elite confident athletes can recognize when they get to yellow. They notice that sensation, and then they have tools to bring them back to the flow, and one of those tools is breathwork OK, one of the most underutilized simple tools that athletes can use. Average athletes are lucky to be breathing out there.

Speaker 1:

Elite confident athletes use habitual and intentional breathing to engage their parasympathetic nervous system. All right, that is their opposite of the sympathetic. It's responsible for rest and digest and it regulates them, brings them back to the flow. All right. And number five have a failure recovery method. We call ours the snapback routine. Average athletes just spiral. Like I said, they go from red to green super fast. Elite confident athletes have a specific routine that they practice to regulate the nervous system and snapback quickly. So ours is a combination of a intentional breath, a reset word at the top that they have gone through to. They go through a process to create that word for them that has meaning and then on their exhale they're doing a reset signal that helps ground them. And then we tie it all together with a specific visualization to help them utilize that before it's needed.

Speaker 1:

Now, confidence doesn't come from never making mistakes. Confidence comes from athletes knowing how to handle them and when they have those skills, those five things which are really simple, simple things, then they have the confidence to handle them. And that is the key to your daughter excelling in her sport and having fun, because I know how it's been. Maybe she's been timid and hesitating. And it's hard Like I see in the chat if the coach is pulling right away. It's like, oh, how can she have a chance to come back? She spirals, she's in her own head, she's dreading the car ride home and so are you All right Flipping? This is a game changer. She's prepared, she trusts herself, she can take risks because she has a way to recover. She can have her head up high five in your teammates. One mistake doesn't get her down and you have peace of mind knowing like everyone's in a much better mood. We don't have Miss Grumpy Pants in the backseat over here making it so that we can't even enjoy a dinner out. As a family. We can actually move on, and the athlete that can move through mistakes fastest has the greatest competitive advantage.

Speaker 1:

I want you to think about your daughter's sport. Tell me in the chat how long does your daughter's sport allow her to come back from a mistake? If you've never thought about this before, I want you to. I will use volleyball as an example. There's about 20 seconds between each serve. Ok, so she has to be back and over her mistake in 20 seconds or less. If she golfs, maybe she has a little longer, depending on how far she hit the ball. A lot of you are saying seconds Basketball, if there's no time out or anything like that, then she's going to be back on defense. Right, it's swimming, gymnastics? Yeah, she's got to be back immediately. So if your daughter takes longer than that, then she is being beat out by athletes who do know how to come back, all right. And on the flip side, if she has a routine to come back, then she has a competitive advantage and this is what Coco experienced.

Speaker 1:

Lara, her mom, told me the other day yeah, coco's a gymnast and she had an event. She fell on beam. Wasn't supposed to happen, OK. But not only did she just get back up on beam, did her snapback routine got back up. She also went on to her next event or routine and crushed it. Now before she would have struggled through the rest of her routine and then the rest of the day would have been shot. Ok, there's no coming back from that, she's just spiraling. All right, this is the difference that having a routine makes. All right. This is April.

Speaker 1:

Her daughter, jocelyn, was told by a lot of coaches, just like you, she has the ability, it's just her mind holding her back. Ok, her AAU coach would tell her that all the time when she learned a way to come back from mistakes. Now she's not as discouraged as when she messes up. And, april said my favorite part of this whole thing was that that same AAU coach is now praising her that she has finally turned the corner. Ok, don't leave it to the ache you coach, though, to teach that skill, all right.

Speaker 1:

Number two releasing the pressure. We've got over overcoming mistakes. We're on to releasing the pressure, and I know how much pressure your daughter puts on herself, and so do you. Maybe she's comparing herself, she feels like she has to be perfect, and she maybe has some overwhelming pre-performance nerves. Give me a yes in the chat if you're like, yeah, my daughter gets maybe even a little sick before she competes or leading up to competition. Yeah, we've had a lot of athletes, and these are very normal experiences, by the way. For sure, I see you, Erin. And if your daughter does compare, if she is a perfectionist, if she does get sick or feel like she's got tummy troubles before she competes, that's normal. Ok, take a deep breath, because it is All right.

Speaker 1:

And the thing is all athletes face that, but most athletes just don't have the skills to navigate it and they think something's wrong with them. Ok, but the normal response of us as moms is to say things like this Stop being so hard on yourself. You don't have to be perfect, don't compare. And all of these things are true, right, like. We want to give her advice, we want to say these things, OK, but they're typically not working. Your advice is not working, and in that 25 key phrases, there are some different things that we have in there that you can say before a competition that will help a little bit in those moments, ok.

Speaker 1:

The other piece of this, though, is that these are her own mental experiences. There's two parts to this what you say, ok, and how you're supporting her, but also her own mental skills, because you're not in her head, right? She has to be able to learn these skills, to navigate them. They're not just picked up along the way, ok. So, to release some of this pressure that she feels, I'm going to go into one of the most important parts of an athlete's mental game, and that is shifting and noticing her thoughts. Ok, average athletes are not aware of what they're thinking. They believe everything they think. They get stuck in these spirals of negative thinking, and that's why you're here. You're like, if only she would stop thinking so negative, if only she would believe in herself, then some of this pressure would be released. Right, because elite, confident athletes know there's thousands of thoughts that come and go. Ok, the latest research and this is what we tell athletes too is that we think over 50,000 thoughts a day. That is a heck of a lot of thoughts. Like, we cannot hang on to all of those thoughts, and so they know hey, I can let these thoughts come and go and yeah, as an adult, absolutely We'll get into that. It works with us too. All right, and having the ability to notice this thought is not serving me and is not productive. And shift it is a game changer. Ok, in fact, when athletes utilize these skills, they can sound like this this is Lily, one of the athletes in our program, and it was so awesome she goes.

Speaker 1:

I had a mindset shift, meaning I deliberately chose to change my mind based on what I was focusing on. Instead of comparing myself to others, I now focus on enjoying myself and everything I do. This has allowed me to have more fun. Hey, have more fun. And also, I am doing better. I am doing better. When athletes can shift their mindset based on what they're choosing to focus on, they improve. Genevieve, I love that. This is so cute. She was like, hey, I got a win in my mental game. We were losing. On Saturday I changed my attitude, meaning I decided the thoughts I was thinking were not serving me. I shifted to something new, more productive. We scored three more goals and we won the game. I was like go, genevieve, that's right, and here's why this works.

Speaker 1:

This is called the Thought Wheel, and this is a foundational concept that we teach all athletes. It applies to us as parents and just as people as well. Situation we're going to start here. Situations come and go and your daughter can't control all the situations that she is in. We can't control them for her either, but she does get to control what she thinks about and so say she chooses to think a thought that comes into her head that is not so productive. Let's go to a situation that I commonly hear. Commonly hear this one I'm not getting the playing time I want.

Speaker 1:

If your daughter plays a team sport, she plays an individual sport. Maybe it's something like I'm not playing how I want to play. She can choose over 50,000 thoughts, I think. And she holds on to a thought, though. That's something like well, I'm not getting the playing time. I want, because my coach doesn't like me. Put a yes in the chat if you ever heard that from your daughter, and it's fine if you have. Remember our brain's trying to make sense. It wants to create a story, yeah, and we want to put in the validity of that is not what we're questioning right now. But, yeah, ok, or I'm just the worst one, ok, and I'm never going to get better.

Speaker 1:

If she plays a non-team sport, ok. So if she is thinking that thought my coach doesn't like me or I'm the worst one feelings are going to follow. Ok, feelings follow thoughts, and this is happening potentially at a subconscious level, though she is likely going to feel unmotivated, discouraged, like when we feel like somebody doesn't like us or we're the worst one on the team. We're not feeling so great. Ok, she goes into practice with those feelings.

Speaker 1:

Ok, either consciously or subconsciously. And how is she going to train? How is she going to practice? Likely not as good as she could. If she's feeling like somebody isn't like her, especially the coach. She's probably going to avoid the coach a little bit. Maybe she's even going to not work on her weaknesses because she doesn't want to get worse or make it look worse, and so she's probably not going to train at the level that she could be and, as a result, she's not going to get the results that she wants if she's not training at that level, and that is going to put her back in this situation, maybe on the bench or not playing how she wants to, confirming this thought my coach doesn't like me, or I'm the worst one on the team, because here's the thing your brain and her brain do not want to be wrong. All right, my coach wants to find all the evidence inside her environment that this is true, and so my coach doesn't like me.

Speaker 1:

Ok, I'm going to go look around, I'm going to make sure. Oh see that she looked at her funny and didn't get it. And it's going to go around and around and around and around. And when we go around and around and around, these thoughts no longer are thoughts. They turn into beliefs. We'll talk about how important beliefs are. You already know what your daughter believes about herself impacts so much of her life. But let's say that your daughter has a skill to change the thought when it comes in, all right.

Speaker 1:

So she's in this situation. She's like dang. I really don't like the situation, but I'm thinking my coach doesn't like me. I'm thinking I'm the worst one on the team, but that's not productive. I'm going to find something more productive. More productive might be something like there's an opportunity here. I don't know what it is, but I'm going to find it. That will lead to feelings, maybe of optimism, maybe of motivation. She goes to practice, feeling optimistic, motivated. Maybe she's going to ask for coaching, maybe she's going to get there a little early, work on her weaknesses, she's going to work harder, she's going to watch film. What results is she going to get? I'll tell you right now my athletes that are doing all of those things are getting better at their sport and that's going to put her in a better situation. Not guaranteeing playing time, because that's out of her control. We teach athletes hey, that's not in your bucket, let it go, control what you can control. But she's going to get better, she's going to enjoy her sport more and that's going to confirm that thought of hey, there's always opportunities around me. It all depends on what I'm looking for. And this is so powerful when your daughter has this skill to shift that thought.

Speaker 1:

And the other analogy I love to give is a smoothie. We make smoothies all the time at our house and when you make a smoothie and you're done with it and you have all the smoothie stuff on the inside of the glass and you're like, ok, I'm going to rinse this out quickly, it's easy. It's easy to rinse it out, just like when a non-productive thought comes in and you change it and shift it. It's pretty simple, doesn't take a lot of time. But when you let this smoothie glass sit here for an hour, like the situation I'm going to be in, or longer, that smoothie stuff gets hard and it gets harder and harder to rinse off. I've got to soak it, I've got to scrub it. That's what happens when your daughter continues with this thought pattern, these feeling patterns, these actions, and it goes around and around and around. It gets harder and harder and harder to change.

Speaker 1:

It is possible it's what we do here at the Elite Comeditor but it turns into a belief if we don't change it. And beliefs live in your daughter's subconscious mind. Here's the thing about the subconscious mind. It controls 90% of what your daughter does, no matter what the conscious and logical responses like hey, you aren't the worst one, your coach actually does like you and who cares if your coach doesn't like you, whatever? That's conscious, that's logical. But that's only controlling 10% of what she does. 90% of what she does is controlled by her beliefs about herself in her subconscious mind, and so when you are just hoping that she's going to listen to your advice, she's only doing it with about 10% of her capacity.

Speaker 1:

The example we give is that to athletes it's like an elephant in a rider Her elephant is her subconscious mind and the rider is the conscious mind on top. And if the elephant wants to go to the right and the rider wants to go to the left, who is going to win? Obviously, it's the elephant. It's big, it's strong, it has the power. And so what do we need to do? We've got to train the elephant, because the elephant will always win. So let's train it. And the elephant can be trained and accessed through stories, visualizations, metaphors, emotions. The one that we lean into a lot in this program and in our work is visualizations and sports psychology. It's huge.

Speaker 1:

And here's the thing Up until now it's probably banned. She plays well in a practice but then falls apart in a game because of the pressure, the stakes are higher and there's just more pressure there and her belief about herself in those situations is I don't know if I can do this she's comparing herself to other people, not feeling good enough, and that becomes a belief. You hope that the coach teaches the mental side of the game. Well, don't hold your breath, please. Her hard work can actually pay off when she has that skill of shifting. She can set healthy goals, use other people's inspiration and you're at ease knowing, like whoo, she's got this. You can't be in her head and remember she will never outperform her belief about herself. Her belief is her elephant, and so we have to train the elephant and we've got to teach her that skill of shifting her thoughts.

Speaker 1:

And another really great example of this is Evelyn and Teret. So Evelyn is Teret's mom. She said she had a daughter kind of like those of you that were saying in the chat who would get sick and before really, really nervous before practices and competitions. And now Evelyn says she has a much more positive approach. She seems excited to play and not as nervous. So when athletes are changing how they think about competition and also how they think about the feelings in their bodies. All right, we tell athletes hey, because it's true, anxiousness and nervousness actually feel the same as excitement before you compete. All it's all in how you label it and what you're choosing to think about that. Are you thinking anxiousness and nervousness are like a reason for me to fail, or this is the reason why I'm going to go do great, because my body is preparing me for this moment? Ok, yeah, all right, we're on our last one. So flipping negative mindset.

Speaker 1:

If you're multitasking, come on back to me, because this is one of the most common things that I hear from moms. They're telling me things like this Tell me in the chat, if you hear this, I try I can't even compliment her correctly is what my mom told me the other day? I try and tell her hey, you did great. And she's like, no, but this was wrong and that was wrong. Or we're watching after a game and I'm like, wow, things went well. And she was like, oh, but did you see this? And it's just like she can't hang on or she can't let go of all of these negative things. Yeah, erin, I hear you Give me a yes in the chat.

Speaker 1:

If it's like, yeah, everything seems to always go to negative for some reason. Ok, yeah, absolutely. That was my five hour trip. Yeah, I just heard from a mom too. It was like, wow, we had a six hour car ride and it was just this negative spiral the whole time and I was just trying to get her to go the other way.

Speaker 1:

But here's the thing. This is actually pretty normal. Athletes think that they have to be hard on themselves in order to play well, or otherwise they're just letting their guard down. They don't want others to think they're too good, so they focus on their flaws. I see this a lot in girl athletes and it just drives me bonkers. And, like I said before, they don't know the difference between thought and fact. They just believe everything that comes to their mind, and oftentimes it's not serving them. And remember the brain's number one job is to keep us safe. So research shows that people tend to focus more on the negative as they make sense of their experiences. We call this the negativity bias.

Speaker 1:

So your daughter is actually doing something normal, ok, and so when we come in and we say things like hey, just focus on the positives, you're just as good as everyone else, don't feel nervous, all of those things, we're actually lowering her confidence, and here's why, ok, confidence at its root we lean on Dr Lisa DeMores work in this area and Dr Becky Kennedy's work in this area is self-trust. When our daughters trust themselves, then they feel equipped to go out and take risks and know that they have the skills necessary to get through whatever. They're adaptable. Ok, so when and part of trusting themselves is trusting how they feel. And so when we tell them to feel something different than how they should be feeling, or telling them that like, hey, your experience actually is not valid, right, your experience should be something different we are now actually telling them to not trust themselves and we are lowering their confidence. And so we really talk a lot about this in the mom side of our program, because our approach to mental training heavily brings in the parent, because we influence our daughter's confidence so much. Ok, and so when we say these things in that 25 key phrase document, there are some ideas for some different ways.

Speaker 1:

Ok, but really, unfortunately, telling isn't teaching. I wish I could tell my athletes, like, be confident, and they were like, oh, that's just what I needed. Ok, it does not work. She actually needs just you and then needs to learn the skills of shifting her own thoughts. You can't do this for her, but there are a few things that you can do. It's two parts to this. Ok, it's yours and it's hers. First part stay in your role Athlete, coach excuse me ref and parent. If you've been around the elite competitor, you know that there's four roles, and yours is already chosen for you. You're not the athlete anymore. It's her experience. You're not the coach. If you are the coach of your daughter's team, we can talk about that in the Q&A. I have some strategies for you, but you first have to nail the parent role. You cannot use that as a pass to get out of staying in your role as the parent. Okay, you're not the ref. Don't be the ref on the side, or that coach parent on the side, like doing that. Okay, you're the parent.

Speaker 1:

Two main things that you have complete control over. You shape the environment and you provide the opportunities. You provide the opportunities for her physical training and her mental training. That is your job. Okay, you also shape the environment, though. Okay, shape the environment by how you show up with your verbal communication and your nonverbal communication. Those are those two main things. Your verbal communication, what you say to her before, during and after she competes, and some of those things are in the 25 key phrases document. Okay, but that's really what we teach moms is. And dads Okay, this is how you approach the situation, this is what you say, this is how you know how we can change. Nonverbal is how you show up.

Speaker 1:

Okay, and your confidence that you're exuding and here's a big piece of this Realize that your daughter self-talking her confidence is actually tied to yours. And if you're like most moms that we work with, okay, maybe you don't feel 100% confident yourself I'm in that camp too Okay, I think, as moms, we are always you know, we're always battling this. Maybe we're seeing something in our athletes that we saw in ourselves and we were like, whether we were athlete or not, and we're like, oh gosh, here it is. I went through that and I don't want that for my daughter, okay. And if you're thinking like, well, wait this, I know this is for my daughter's negative thinking like, why are we talking about me? I want you to stick with me, because this is why our approach to mental training is so different, it's our secret sauce and it's why it works. Okay, it's why we get the results that we get, because your confidence and her confidence actually go hand in hand. Okay, they're very closely connected to each other.

Speaker 1:

So we know that moms of confident athletes notice and shift their self-talk as well. You know that, your dot, how important this is for your daughter. You know from the thought wheel that what she's thinking about herself impacts how she feels and what she does and the results that she gets and the energy that she shows up with and what she attracts into her life. Right, the same thing happens for you All, right, and so when we are thinking these thoughts of I used to be fit, or there's never enough time, or so lazy, all of these like unproductive thoughts that we're wanting our daughters to change, if we are actually ruminating on these two, it is impacting every single person that we come in contact with, including our daughters, okay, and so I want you to know exactly we are a mirror. We are a mirror to them, okay, and so tell me in the chat what is one thought that you will shift immediately, knowing it is not serving you and it is not serving your daughter, right, and if you're going to a place of guilt or you're like what the heck? Okay, come on back, I want you to go to a place of empowerment, knowing that you actually can control your daughter's confidence a little bit. Right, you can actually shape her confidence and how she sees herself, just based on changing your own thoughts. And we'll talk about your own words as well. Okay, For me, the thoughts are around time and body. Okay, time and body. There's never enough time. Okay, I'm going to stop using that. I'm going to stop being a victim to that. Okay, I'm going to. That's not serving me. It's not serving my daughter. Okay, here's the other piece of this.

Speaker 1:

Moms of confident athletes are intentional with the words they say, because they become their daughter's inner voice. What you say out loud about yourself impacts your daughter's inner voice and what she says about herself. Now, you probably already tell your daughter she's smart, capable, amazing. Don't stop doing that. Okay, but what are we saying about ourselves? And when we say things like I hate the way my legs look, or I'll never be able to figure this out, or another thing, I'm so stressed Okay, all those things, she's building an inner voice, all, right. She is saying things like well, my legs are strong legs. My legs kind of look like my mom's, or maybe they will when I get older, and now she's building this internal voice that is mirroring what you're saying about yourself. Okay, and I know there's a.

Speaker 1:

There's a lot of research in this area that I'm not going to go deep into. We go a lot into into the mom's side of our program, but just know what are, what are you saying out loud and what do you want your daughter's inner voice to be? Okay, at a subconscious level, and so you know. To illustrate this, brené Brown okay, we use a lot of her work as well. We can only love others as much as we love ourselves. We never want to limit the amount of confidence, love, compassion that our daughter has for herself, because we're limiting that in ourselves, we're not giving that to ourselves. Okay, what are we mirroring? Okay, so tell me in the chat what is one thing that you'll stop saying out loud immediately?

Speaker 1:

For me it was all around body. I'm going to stop picking myself apart in the mirror or saying like, oh, I just hate the way, blah, blah, blah. Okay, that's not saying that we have to be positive all the time, but we can just be neutral, all right, yeah, I, you know I'm not feeling confident today, but I have a body. And here I am. Okay, so my legs are, are are strong, they can, they are allowing me to run today. Okay, yeah, I hate for sure Body, I don't have time for sure.

Speaker 1:

What do we want our daughters saying to themselves, especially in these key moments where she's under pressure, when she's up against challenge? Do we want her saying things like I can't do this, I'm not capable, this is too much, or, yeah, this is hard, but I can do hard things, okay. So what do we want to empower our daughters in our voice to be and doing this and shifting our self-talk? I love. Yeah, you guys are doing awesome work. This actually doesn't take a lot of time, but it takes intention, okay. But what you're doing right now and what your daughter does actually, when she does train her mind, it actually, you know, the output is bigger than what she puts in, which is amazing. Okay, you're doing mental training right now. Remember the thought wheel. This is all happening at the thought level. Okay.

Speaker 1:

Now, negative thinking, I hear, is tough, like beating herself up roller coaster, emotion, car ride home gosh. Okay. When she has the skill of being able to shift this and you are also modeling for her, she can actually productively improve right Confidence she can count on and you can count on, and you guys can actually look forward to the post game. All right, it is possible. A positive outcome cannot come from a negative mind. All right, yeah, I know I feel so many in these comments too. I resonate with all of this. All right, becca our basketball, one of our basketball players in our program she knows this too.

Speaker 1:

My negative thinking was holding me back. All right, when I found better ways to deal with negative thoughts. Now I had other ways to calm my mind and the best part is this is noticeable throughout your daughter's whole life. All right, not just in her sport. Like people, I yes, I became a coach. I love volleyball. I love teaching I actually love teaching just last year, but and I love the work that we do.

Speaker 1:

But, honestly, this is a vehicle and this is a platform to be able to teach young girls how to believe in themselves and how to have confidence that they carry throughout their sport and throughout their whole entire life. Okay, now, this is how you raise a daughter who believes in herself as much as you do, and so the big question we're at right now is are you at a place where you want to take the guesswork out of how to help your athlete daughter really build this confidence. Give me a yes in the chat If you're like I want to stop Googling. I want to stop relying on Instagram or TikTok for like tips, right? You deserve better than Instagram tips, tips and TikToks. Yeah, yes, absolutely, which is why I'm excited to talk about the elite mental game, because doors right now are open to our winter enrollment special. We have some special pricing, discounts and bonuses, some other like awesome things that we're doing, and this is the program that we have created that has helped thousands of moms and daughters, just like you, build their confidence, and also for moms to know exactly how to support their daughters.

Speaker 1:

This is the program that I wish I had in middle school and high school. I guarantee if I had this program, I would not have burned out. I would have not quit. Okay, luckily, I had such an amazing opportunity to learn these skills and have a turnaround, and that is why I'm sharing these gifts with the world. All right, and that is also why my mom tells me to this day that she would have wished she would have had a program like this so that she could tell me. You know what I needed to hear in those moments, okay. So I would say you join. Okay.

Speaker 1:

What does this look like? And I feel you, I'm feeling the feels too. What does this look like? What is the elite mental game? How have thousands of people gotten results in this? All right, and here's what happens. When you are inside the program with us, both you and your athlete have access to our elite mental game trainings for athletes and parents. And this is where the magic happens. This is where she learns how to build her mental game. Okay, set big dreams, clear goals, go after them, optimize her performance, you know, really build that foundation of a confident, strong mental game that really the best athletes do. Okay, this program really is like none other. It's two programs in one, in one.

Speaker 1:

Okay, like I said, our approach is so different than anything you will see. All right, you finally get the playbook for parents. You get access to our powerful pep talks, which is our sports mom game plans. You get scripts for every situation. You know exactly what to say and do before, during and after her competitions. We set you up for success because, honestly, how many coaches has your daughter had in her sports career Like my daughter is. So she's young and she's had like 10 coaches already. How many coaches have you had? All right, like not, not many, like maybe none at all. And that is what we provide for you, all right.

Speaker 1:

And at the same time, your daughter is going through her own set of mental game trainings following our unstoppable athlete method, and you both score points and unlock prices as you go. So the elite mental game is literally a game. Okay, so you're all gamified at your getting points and prizes, and so it's really fun and really rewarding. And so how, like let's get to the nitty-gritty, like, how exactly does this work? So, when you enroll, you join, and then all of the athletes in your household also have access to it. So the license is good for all your athletes. Okay, so you enroll them, you enroll your partner and your spouse. Dads are 100% welcome. In fact, we encourage it. We want dads to be on the same page as you as well with how you're talking to your athlete, how you're approaching her, and you can also do this part later, like if you jump in cause, we're going to talk about this awesome pricing discount and some bonuses that we have, and you're like hey, but you know I'm going to enroll her later. Totally fine, that can be done at another time. Okay, you log into your training portal. Looks like this Okay, that's accessible on any browser on a phone or computer.

Speaker 1:

A lot of athletes do their trainings on the bus, on the way to their games. Then you grab your athlete and parent playbooks which are like this, so it takes you through all of the lessons and then you start working through all phases of the game. It's like a board game kind of. You go through all of these phases which are intentionally designed to build upon each other, to build her mental game and also build your toolkit on how to support her. Now here is the training plan that we suggest For athletes. We suggest they go through at about 30 minutes a week. So this is the training plan that we give them. 30 minutes a week will get them through our program in about three months. Now, 30 minutes a week is not very long and these are short, on-demand training, so between three and about 15 minutes. I know it's 10 to 20 on there, but really they're very short, easy to consume.

Speaker 1:

Like I said, I have a master's in education. I taught for 10 years and so I bring a lot of this education background into our training. So athletes are finding they are very motivated as they go through. They're interactive, they're in the portal. We're commenting back with them as well. So this training plan, though, sets them up for success. They can. Athletes easily are like okay, I'm going to check all the boxes, I'm going to get through Again three months, but a lot of athletes go through a lot faster than this because they find 30 minutes is actually not that long a week.

Speaker 1:

She gets immediate results within the first week. Okay, we find that athletes that's where they learn their snapback routine that I talked about in this training. So, within week one, they are learning and developing their custom snapback routine and using it in practice. And if they do not, they're not getting results from that. Within seven days, you email us and we give you your money back. So we guarantee that athletes are getting results within that first week. And then you have lifetime access, and she has lifetime access to all of this training. Okay, this never goes away and in fact, we intentionally do that because it grows with her. And we want athletes to go back to phase two, especially before every sport season. That's where they set their goals, they orient themselves with their daily mindset routine, and so this is something they can always come back to. We also have visualizations in every training and they're pulled out. We've got about 14 visualizations and meditations that athletes can just pop in there their AirPods and listen to before a game or on the bus. It's amazing.

Speaker 1:

Okay, katherine said my favorite part was listening to coach Bray, her tips, her knowledge. Thank you, katherine. I did not pay her to say that, okay, but also, I have learned so much and it will help me better understand in a game. Being more focused Okay, not focusing on things I can't control, deciding where I'm going to direct my thoughts. Okay, this is how she will play her best and compete and show up and guess what? These changes happen so quickly.

Speaker 1:

All right, shay is one of the moms in our program and she said I have watched my kids change over such a short period of time. She had a boy and a girl athlete come through the program to, not only as athletes but as little humans and advocates of their journey. Okay, some of the surprises that athletes get throughout the program are awesome. So she's getting don't tell her this. Okay, these are supposed to be surprises, but they pop up randomly throughout as she goes through. So we give her a handmade bracelet that's actually made from one of our EMG alumni athletes. Elite competitor merch water bottle. We also have a have a food as fuel workshop because it's done by our sports dietician, lindsay Cortez. She's amazing. And so you don't have to nag your daughter anymore to like, hey, make sure that you're eating this or that before or after a game. She lays it all out timing, protein, carb, fat, sources Like it's great, okay. And then she gets little treats as she goes through as well.

Speaker 1:

Now, the elite mental game training is what you have lifetime access to. Okay, but what's really cool is that your first three months and your daughter's first three months in the program, you get live support and coaching from us, from me and my team of coaches, and one of the really awesome ways that we provide live support and coaching is through coach on call texting. So if your daughter has a phone, we're checking in with her every week for those three months and very short check-ins just kind of seeing like, hey, how's it going? You know any wins, any, anything you're struggling with, and athletes love this. They respond back to those texts and then also they just use it as like hey, I've got a game coming up, I'm feeling a little nervous. You got anything and we're there. We respond Monday through Friday, within 24 hours, and athletes love it because it's just so informal too. They're like I got it, I get an individualized coaching Plus, I don't have to, like you know, meet face to face with somebody. A lot of athletes are like this is this is great, it's on demand, okay, and you also get that support as well. So we have a team of parent coaches who are all equally certified in the same certification area that I am. So three parent coaches, including um, and then also me, and then we have an another athlete coach, including me as well, and so you're never alone, you're just a text away, we're literally in your back pocket, okay.

Speaker 1:

Another um aspect of the life support is our athlete level up group coaching. Now, these are optional, but we love it when athletes come on live calls with us. So these happen two times a month and they're split by age. So athletes come on and they we do a little mindset training, they ask questions and athletes just love it because they see they're not alone and they're like oh, wow, this is great and athletes participate in a variety of ways. They some of them, just sit on there and they just listen Totally fine. And then some are very participatory. They're cameras off, they're off mute and all of that Okay. So, however your athlete likes to participate, works, and also, if she just wants to watch the replay or not watch it all, that's fine too. It's just an optional resource. Really, the transformation comes from the content in the program and the level up calls are just a bonus to that, okay. However, a softball player, uh, did say one of them said my favorite part of the program, where the zoom calls maybe feel like more athletes are out there working on themselves in their mental game, no matter what the sport, which is pretty cool.

Speaker 1:

The last part of the live support is for you, mom, okay. Like I said, our approach to mental training is like none other, and so you have access to our sports moms and our circle membership for the first three months inside your program. This membership is amazing. It's our community of sports moms who are going through the program Just like you. We have support. We have a Facebook group together. We have live calls. Every single week we have some sort of live event that's happening with me or with the other coaches either a zoom call, a Q and A, a guest speaker, live trainings based on hot topics that you want to hear about.

Speaker 1:

So you are like between our coaches and also all the moms inside the community there is not a situation that we have not encountered or faced. So if you're like, hey, you know I got this unique thing going on with my daughter or coach or whatever, we've got you, okay, it's such a supportive communication or community. No one's going to judge you Like we're all here and sometimes you just want to hear it from you know you're on your daughter's team and it's like you can't really talk to the other moms and so this is your community to really make sure you get answers and support. And when you do get those answers and support, you're going to sound like Amelia. She goes now my mom knows how to help me. I look back instead of guessing. She knows how to help. So it's strengthened our relationship.

Speaker 1:

Okay, and Nicole said I'm so grateful for more dialogue that's opening with my daughter. In the program as you're both going through, there are touch points where you're communicating with each other and it's a really beautiful thing and that is how you raise a fearlessly confident girl athlete who believes in herself and plays like it. Okay, I'm going to go into our special pricing discount and then we are also giving away a free spot inside EMG at the end of our Q&A. But don't forget today's fast action bonus. So those of you that join while we're on right now, when we're on live, I'll be talking for the next. However many questions we have for Q&A probably about 15 minutes. So while when you join during that time you get our fast action bonus of our rise above teammate drama and thrive under challenging coaches training bundle.

Speaker 1:

So, as I said at the beginning, this is the bundle that helps your athlete know how to navigate challenging coaches, how to talk to a coach. We give them sentence starters, our framework also for you to know, like what do I do, do I step in or stay off? And also how she can navigate challenging teammates, which happened. You also get a free ticket to our peak performance clinic happening on Sunday. I talked about that at the beginning as well. This is really a cool event for athletes to know how to stay motivated through the grind. Now there's a replay for everything, so don't worry if she can't make it live, but this is open to you when you join EMG by Sunday, so it's a really cool event.

Speaker 1:

All right, remember the doors to the mental game are open right now. You get lifetime access to all those trainings, plus three months of bonus, live support and coaching. This is everything that's included inside EMG All of the support there. And I'm seeing some questions in the chat about live support. Yeah, you can absolutely delay live support. If you want to jump in when we talk about the pricing discounts and then delay live support, just love us now. Okay, the total value of EMG is about $6,000. And our standard pricing of program is one time payment of $13.97 or $3,000 of $493. But right now, like I said, we've got a special going on and, as a thank you for showing up here and trusting us to guide you and your daughter's sports journey, we have an enrollment special for $400 off the program when you join by February 16. So that is our winter enrollment that's happening right now. So $400 off means one time payment of $9.97, $3 of $359, or we actually added a payment option of $183 a month for six months. Okay, so we've got payment options and also $400 discount until February 16.

Speaker 1:

Joinemgnowcom is where you go to enroll in the Elite Mental Game and, as I said, when you join, while we are on here, live. That's when you get that teammate drama and challenging coach training bundle. And we also have our Peep Performance Clinic happening on Sunday, which is an awesome event that your daughter gets a free ticket to as well. Okay, great questions in the chat. By the way, I'm going to get to those. We also have a seven day guarantee on the program, so you jump in if you're like, yeah, sounds good, sounds great. I'm going to jump in, get the bonuses, get the pricing discount and then, if your daughter does not get results with her snapback routine within seven days, email us the word guarantee and we will initiate your exit from the program and give you a full refund. Okay, can't wait to see you inside with other moms and daughters like Jen and Ava. It was so awesome.

Speaker 1:

Jen, after Ava started the program, said at least four different parents came up to me and asked what were we doing differently than the week before? All right, chrissy is a therapist and she said I know how important the mom-daughter connection is. This program is so needed. My daughter, chloe, is getting so much from it. We always ask our athletes like hey, what's going on with your mental game? And she you know we have athletes on the call saying things like I'm responding to mistakes better. I'm using my snapback routine now instead of spiraling. You know, I now know how to talk to my daughter or to my coach without, you know, breaking down or taking feedback of something bad.

Speaker 1:

So, when you go to joinemgnowcom, you're going to come to a page that looks like this this is Macy. She's actually one of my senior captains and models for the program, so you'll click this button to say yes, please sign us up. You're going to choose your investment option. We also have an option for that six pay as well. Right there, if that works better for your family, you're going to enroll to check out. That page will look like that You're going to get a welcome video from me. Hello, hello. You're going to enroll your athlete and your partner or spouse. If you want, you can totally do this at a separate time, okay, and then, when you do, though, you're each going to get a login, and the training portal will look like this when you log in, you're going to see your parent EMG and athlete EMG, and then you will see all of the trainings. Okay, like I said, these are very short and you go through all of the phases and one of the trainings. If you just click on one, it'll look something like this so this training is about six minutes long. You, when, as soon as you watch the training, as soon as your daughter watches the training, it marks complete, she earns a point, she collects points and they look like this Like I said, it's kind of like a board game, okay, and then those are her prizes too, that get unlocked as she goes through. Okay, and here we are. So here's all the details.

Speaker 1:

Joinemgnowcom is where you go to enroll when you join. While we're on here live, we've got a timer here, so I'll be answering questions for about 15 minutes. You get that fast section bonus of the Rise Web teammate drama and Thrive Under Challenging Coaches training bundle. We have the special pricing discount available until February 16th. But if you want the training bundle, that's what you need to jump into now to get that, to get that bonus. And then our peak performance clinic is happening this Sunday. So join me for Sunday to grab a ticket for that, okay. So I am going to open up my Q&A, doc, and then, after I'm done with Q&A, we'll draw our free winner for a spot inside EMG. I'm going to take a drink right here.

Speaker 1:

Okay, curious how this works for the off season training. Yes, great question. I'm assuming the game training plan is applicable as it's retraining for the mental game, but using physical practices as the triggers. I'm trying to figure out best timing. Great question.

Speaker 1:

Okay, you can't go wrong with in-season versus out-of-season. We see benefits to both. Out-of-season, like you said, she has less high stakes environments to practice her skills in. So she's doing like pick up or she's just doing like lower pressure stuff. So she can still apply her skills, get that foundation and then when she starts her season, like we said, you go back to phase two, okay, and do phase two so it really orients you for your season, and then she has an idea of like the visualizations and meditations that work for her. She can use her pre-performance visualization. So, yeah, you can't go wrong there. In season she has a lot of opportunities right to practice her mental game because it's just there. But potentially there's like more time constraints in season. So if you want to delay your three months of live support, just reach out to our team as soon as you enroll and let us know so that we can work on that in the back end and then she can get going with the content you know in the off season and then, once her season starts, she can have all the coaching that she needs and that you need. I think I also saw in that live support what happens after three months. We do have options to continue the live support in our membership as well, so you'll learn about that at the end of the program.

Speaker 1:

Okay, if my athlete has an attentive ADHD and lacking certain executive functioning skills with this, it'll be okay for her to take part in. Great question, actually, can we grab your email, because I have. We've had athletes who have ADHD come through the program and there was a mom in particular who shared in depth about her experience with her daughter, who has ADHD, going through and what had been really helpful for her, what parts of the program really resonated, and then she also ended up tweaking a little bit of the program because some of those skills that we teach she wasn't experiencing, as you know, as an athlete with ADHD. So I think that it would be really helpful to hear her perspective. But short answer is yes, we have had many athletes with ADHD come through. So, and the trainings are short, they're easy to consume. We also find the meditations for athletes with ADHD are like really great too, a lot of this like focusing on what she can control. So, yeah, okay, all right. What other questions? What about siblings? Okay, yeah, so we've had, we've had, boys and girls come through the program. Obviously, we have female athlete imagery throughout the program, so you know, your son would have to be okay with that, but these skills do apply to boy athletes as well, and we've had, we've had, them come through with success. So, yeah, as far as the age, so 11 to 18 is the typical age range that we recommend.

Speaker 1:

You know, the younger that your athlete is we have eight is the youngest that we've had in the program and typically if your athlete is younger, you're going to join for one of three reasons, or maybe a combination. Okay, one, she's in a highly competitive environment, right. She's either like a gymnast or, you know, under a lot of pressure, she's played up or something like that. Two, you're starting to notice some of these things that we've talked about. And she's young, right? So some of these things we start to notice as athletes' bodies change. They get a little older, but maybe she's experiencing now or three. You want to prepare her Like you want to make sure she has these skills, because she's going to come up against like it's a guarantee. She's going to feel pressure, she's going to feel nervous, she's going to compare, she's going to make mistakes. You want to make sure she has the skills. So all are very valid reasons.

Speaker 1:

I will say, though, the younger that she is, the more I would do the program with her. Like, we have athletes that are younger. Their moms and dads would like do a Starbucks date, like every every Saturday, and they would sit for you know, 30 minutes and go through the program, and either mom would go through her side and athlete would go through hers, or mom and athlete together are just kind of like watching it at the same time and making sure she's tracking. She has a workbook to follow along. Those are also fillable via, just like her computer as well. But yeah, we've had young athletes. We also have college athletes, so the content itself is applicable to that range.

Speaker 1:

We do split the calls If she wants to come on a live call. We do split those by age. So okay, let's see here what if we miss a live session, no problem. So all of the sessions are recorded and they're uploaded into her training portal afterwards. So, yeah, and same with you, like with all of your live things, and that's happening like no problem. That training portal is amazing For athletes. It's also amazing for moms, because it's just broken out. You have access also for the three months, to any of the trainings and workshops that we have ever done, and we've done a lot, and that's not to overwhelm you, but it's all grouped by topic.

Speaker 1:

And so if you're like, oh, I'm just really struggling with, like you know, how do I get her to talk to her coach? Okay, go to that section and then you'll find like there's like five or six trainings that you can choose from. That's in addition to just the core content that we have in EMG. So, yeah, okay, what if I'm a mom and a coach? Okay, great question. So first you got to nail the parent side. So the parent side like what, what does that look like? How can you make sure that you're supporting her verbally, non-verbally, say, in your role?

Speaker 1:

If you're the coach, the challenge comes with you look like her mom because you are her mom, but the words that are coming out your mouth are a coach, okay, criticizing, critiquing and she's taking that internally as, like you know, she sees two different things and experiencing two different things. And so what? We have one useful tool of many that we teach we actually have a whole section for mom and coach in the program is sit down with her and make two lists, okay, and recognize like I'm a mom and I'm your coach and I'm putting you in a really tough position. I want you to be successful and you know, sometimes it's hard, it's hard for me and I know it's hard for you. Okay, so just recognize that. And then you know, break it up by before, during and after. Okay, competition.

Speaker 1:

So before competition, what does mom look like? Maybe it's she's getting me my snack. She's saying like words that are short and you know, giving me a hug. What does coach look like before a competition? And maybe it's like, hey, you got to remember, you know stuff about the competition you're coaching.

Speaker 1:

During competition, what does mom look like? What does coach look like? After competition? Mom, coach and like, really get specific. And then you sit down and you're like, okay, well, there are times where I have to be coach and then there's also times where you get to choose if you want mom and coach. Okay, and so, like before a game, do you want me to be mom or coach? All right, if it's five minutes before a game, I'm going to be coach, but all the other times you can decide if you want mom or coach. Also, after competition, which one do you want? So you want me to talk to? You know, if you're asking a question like how do you think I did, do you want me to answer that as a mom or as a coach? Because that the answer will be different.

Speaker 1:

Okay, and so just getting clear is one of the key strategies that we teach around this. Okay, what do you do when the coach doesn't coach? Yeah, we coach a lot of moms and athletes on like that's where the coach on call texting and our Facebook group comes in really handy for situations like this, because there's a variety of ways that we would approach this and you know we would first kind of level set what are the expectations and the strengths of the coach, what does your athlete need coaching on that she's not getting? And then we also, you know, equip her with sentence starters and, you know, a framework to be able to approach the coach in a very like non-threatening way around. You know, hey, in this drill I'm really working on angling my platform to target. Can you just watch a few raps and give me some feedback, like teaching them to ask for what they need in those situations? Because coaches got, they have a lot going on in the you know you're, they could be seeing it differently. They feel like they are coaching, you know, we just, I just don't know. And so getting clear and getting on the same page is key for that too.

Speaker 1:

Okay, how does this apply to gymnast having a mental block? Three question We've had a lot of gymnasts come through who are dealing with mental blocks and had success getting through. And really that comes from like the dual approach, because what you're saying to your gymnast when she has a mental block is really important. Okay, if you're pressuring her to get the skill, if you're in our time or reset, we got more time. If you're pressuring her to get the skill, if you're telling her you need to get by this day, if you're bribing her to get the skill, that's all doing the opposite, okay, and if you've done that, it's okay. Okay, you're learning a different way now For athletes themselves. Really it comes.

Speaker 1:

You know, like you learned, her Mignola is sensing a threat in her environment and there's something about the skill that you know it's just it's. It's bringing up a threat subconsciously, even if she's done it before, even if she's had that skill for years and now she can't throw it, you know, and it's very normal. And so helping athletes realize that like it will come back. This is normal. This also applies to athletes that are like in a slump or something like that, where they're just like I just can't like physically do it, and so we use some strategies. First of all, visualization. Like we talked about we got to retrain her elephant, to tell her elephant it's not, there's not a threat, you're safe. We also use progression. So we have athletes like progress and do you know the the most, the hardest level of her skill that she can do is support and then just continue to build up from there.

Speaker 1:

There was some research that I actually saw recently on mental blocks and this would be something that we would individually coach an athlete through, like in Coach Uncall, texting, like even writing out the series of the skills and drawing a picture of it to help kind of retrain the brain of like how it works, but a lot of it is also just taking the pressure off of like hey, if you get it, great, if not, it will come back. It will, it will come back, but the pressure of like getting it is something that keeps athletes stuck in there. Okay, do you find athletes can use this program in conjunction with therapy? Yes, we've had a lot of athletes actually use this in conjunction with therapy or counseling. This is not therapy and it's not counseling.

Speaker 1:

Okay, this is mental, like proven mental skills for athletes to use in sports, in the sports setting. Okay, although it applies, we just had a mom join yesterday who her daughter is a creative writer. I mean, she's a soccer player too, but she's a creative writer, like a nationally claimed creative writer, and has to do a lot of like performing, apparently, like with that, and she's joining the program for that. So like, yeah, this applies to other other activities as well. But, yeah, athletes find and we hear from parents that like it very much compliments therapy and it gives them like a specific way to apply what they're learning, because in therapy for some athletes it's like they're talking about a lot of things and they're making a lot of progress, but because this is sport specific. They can apply it specifically in the setting that they're in all the time, and so it's there's, you know, quicker I don't want to say quicker, but there's like faster results because they have like the opportunity right there to do it. Okay.

Speaker 1:

Group rates or discounts? Okay, yeah, if you're. If we have a group of 10 or more joining than we have a 30% discount on the program. Yeah, so that's what we have. If you have, like, a team that wants to join, so okay, when my daughter is pitching, she performs great. When she's not thinking, absolutely she's in flow state. Right, she needs to be able to throw in a game. Remember that instead of suddenly over analyzing in that moment any advice. Yeah for sure.

Speaker 1:

So we use a variety of things. So something that is helpful, for I mean, pitchers are under a ton of pressure. So we, we teach athletes to have like a very specific pre performance routine that leads up to their performance and in the process of that, they need to identify what their hype number is it's what we call it on a scale of one to 10, how high they need to be and they need to hit that number and they have strategies to get to that number and they have strategies to bring them back down to that number. And so for athletes, we first want to make sure that they're prepared for the competition. They're at their right level of a razzle is kind of like the scientific term for that. And then also, when she is there to get her to, there's a couple strategies that we use to have her just stay in the flow. Part of her pre performance should include some sort of visualization, so she's pre planning how she's going to feel and what she's going to do, because our brain doesn't know the difference between real and imagined. And then also having like her snapback routine, distracting, you know, having something to kind of distract her, and her snapback routine is one of those things that helps kind of distract. And ground as well can help her just kind of like stay in that zone. So there's a lot of like mental strategies and skills that can just keep her there. Some of it comes from preparation ahead of time and then some of it comes from those grounding skills that she uses in the moment.

Speaker 1:

Okay, do you have suggestions on how to approach my 11 year old daughter that I signed us up for the program without impacting her confidence? Oh, great question. Okay, if you're going to talk to your daughter about the program or maybe you signed up and you're like, okay, well, I'm going to roll her later, but I want to tell her that this is, this is what it is Do not tell her that she needs to work on her confidence. Okay, I would even not tell her that she needs to work on her mental game. Okay, you're going to lead.

Speaker 1:

We actually have a resource for you that's probably been in the chat a couple times on. It's a conversation guide for, like, how to approach mental training with your athlete, and we have some suggestions. We also have some podcast episodes that she can listen to from me and also for me, interviewing alumni of the program. We also have, like, an athlete website that she can go to. Don't send her to this enrollment page. This is for you. Send her to the athlete page which is inside that conversation guide. It's elite competitorcom forward slash athlete to help her get an idea of what it is.

Speaker 1:

But really the key here is to lead with her goals. You know, if she has goals of whether that's to level up or just improve or enjoy her sport, that is a great way, and then also lead with your role in this, because our approach is different. You are doing the work too, okay, and a lot of times when you approach your athlete with hey, I maybe have not been the best supportive sports mom for you in the past. I want to do things differently. So I found this program and it's teaching me how to be better for you and so her, seeing that like you're doing the work too, then takes it like kind of off of her a little bit and then you know, then you can bring in and also it's really cool because you know the the co founder of this program is a former college athlete. She trains athletes on how to reach the next level. You know, kind of like use you can use some of that cloud to to help show her that like this is what the best athletes do and you're actually gaining a skill that's going to, you know, really help you and make you better than some athletes. So that's kind of the approach that we go with with the athletes.

Speaker 1:

Okay, any tips on sibling teammate rivalry in athletics? Well, this program address comparison and the harm it can do. Yeah, we actually have a whole training on like getting out of the comparison trap and like you know that comparison is normal, but how to use it for your advantage and what to do if you're finding yourself in a spiral. Because you know, I'll be honest, like in the world of like girl, girl sports and you know female athletics it's like we get in this this kind of negative space. We're just pulling each other down and hoping each other fails, you know. And so we're trying to change the narrative around that. And when athletes are confident, they are less prone to do that and they're confident in themselves, they have the skills that they need. You know they're focusing on their journey. Then we can change this to like hey, if she can do, it's proof, I can too. And let's champion each other, because you know what that's. That's going to come back to me at some point. You know, a givers gain. So if I'm giving support, I'm giving encouragement, I'm seeing athletes, you know, even though, like, she maybe has what I want and it's hard, but if I do that, that's going to come back to me Like that's really something that we we teach a lot, especially in that training.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I have a 12 year old daughter who does competitive cheer when she's learning a new skill. If she doesn't get it quick. She gets frustrated Once they give up. She doubts herself in her abilities and it causes her to not be able to do a skill that had already been previously been able to do. A try to positive reinforcement, not saying anything at all, braving, etc. But we still struggle. Yeah, it sounds kind of like the mental block we that we see with gymnast and competitive cheerleaders. So there's something in her brain that is causing, like alerting, some fear and yeah, so she needs to retrain her elephant and teach her elephant that like, hey, we're safe, we've done this before. You know you take off the pressure of like you know you have to get this by this date. Focus on what she can do, the hardest version of that skill you know and really you like. I don't know how much visualization she's done, but visualization is an enormous tool in this situation.

Speaker 1:

Okay, great questions. We're going to draw our winner in a second for our free spot in EMG. And as far as, like the bonus I saw a question about, can you tell the bonuses again? So when you join while we're on here live, so we'll be on live just for a few more minutes. Yeah, kelsey's excited. Then you get that fast action bonus for the Rise Up Teamate drama and Thrive Under Challenging Coaches bundle. So that's what we get to you.

Speaker 1:

For taking the next step, while we're on here, that $400 discount on the program is good until February 16th. So next Friday, that's when that discount goes away, and then this Sunday is when we're doing this Peek Performance Clinic for how to stay motivated through the grind. So you want to make sure that you know, if you want in on that clinic for your daughter or even for her to watch the replay, that you join me for Sunday to grab one. Yeah, cool, cool. And yes, if you're those of you that are like talking to your daughters, use that conversation guide. That'll go out on an email as well with the replay. If you didn't grab it in the chat, okay. And if you didn't grab your 25 key phrases, make sure you do that. So either DM me, key, on Instagram or just follow that link to the Facebook Messenger and you'll get that.

Speaker 1:

And let's pick our winner. Let's pick our winner before my voice totally goes away, okay. So if you are here on live, go ahead and put your email in the chat. I'll give you a second. Tanya. Sunday's class is 7pm. Eastern 6th Central for Pacific. All right, they're coming in fast, all right. I'll give you a couple more seconds.

Speaker 1:

And, yes, we will be emailing the Zoom link for Sunday. So, those of you that join, you'll get a confirmation email that you are in for the peak performance clinic, but then we'll also send you a reminder before Sunday. And so good to see so many of you on live. I love it. We don't do these live trainings like super often, but when we do it so it's just so fun. Cool, okay, final call, and then Christina's going to draw our winner. Yep, get in, I see you, catherine. Okay, drum roll. Christina.

Speaker 1:

Our winner is Sage. Congratulations, sage. We will reach out to you. Oh, there she is. Yay, we will reach out to you with next steps on how to make sure you are, make sure you're good. I will go back to our yeah, and so let's let's champion Sage in the chat, right, remember this whole like female empowerment thing. Like good job, sage, even though you wish you would have had it too.

Speaker 1:

Okay, all right, we will keep this open for a couple more minutes if you want to hop in and get that fast action bonus. So joinemgnowcom, is that link to enroll, like I said, fast action bonus of the Rise of a teammate drama 500 challenging coaches bundle when you join while we're here, just for like a couple more minutes, and then that special discount on the pricing of the program is good for winter enrollment, which expires on February 16th. And then this Sunday we've got a people performance clinic for your athlete how to stay motivated through the grind. So make sure you join before then. If you want to, we want in on that clinic. Yeah, all right, everyone. So good to see so many of you online, and I will.

Speaker 1:

Um, mary, I don't know what URL means malware, but maybe we can drop it again in the chat, if your question didn't get answered while we were on here live, I will be in the DMs, and so we'll, kim and a little bit. I think, maybe just me, I'm not sure and we'll be in our inbox as well. So if you have any questions, that's where we are. Oh, yeah, join Mary and joinemgnowcom. Yeah, it's the problem. I could see why that would be malware. Last question will we get the performance training if we sign up today? Yes, wendy.

Speaker 2:

Hey, mary, and like the link that I just dropped in the chat, so there's one that's clickable, so that way you don't have to type out join now, all that, just click the one that I'm going to drop right now.

Speaker 1:

There it is. It's okay, Kim.

Speaker 2:

We tried to make it easy with an easy URL, but honestly, the clickable one is just so much easier.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, cool, all right, everyone, enjoy the rest of your pre-Friday and I will see you later.

Building Confidence in Girl Athletes
Training for Challenging Coaches and Drama
Safe and Resilient Athletics Building
Athlete Mistake Recovery and Pressure Release
Shaping Confidence in Moms and Daughters
Building Confidence in Athlete Daughters
Elite Mental Game Training for Athletes
Enrollment, Training, and Support for Athletes
Gymnast Mental Blocks and Mental Skills
Approaching Mental Training and Athlete Support